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Setup

WD MyBook World Edition, Take 2
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With WD’s Application Installer, located on the included software installation CD, mapping the drive was truly easy. After accepting WD’s licensing agreement on my Windows XP notebook, I plugged in the drive to a power outlet, and connected an Ethernet cable between the drive and my wireless router.

Clicking through the installer brought me to the WD “Discovery tool,” which immediately listed “MyBook World” as a found network drive. On the right-hand list of options, I clicked “Map Network Drive,” and the software mapped the two share volumes of the World Edition (Download: Z, and Public: Y) to my machine. When I went to check out the network drive section in “My Computer,” there the two drives were. From there, I could easily manually save files to the network by dragging and dropping.

I attempted to repeat this process on every machine on my home network. I experienced no hiccups with Windows machines (XP or Vista, the process was the same). Based on the limited Quick Install Guide packaged with the World Edition, I knew that the process on a Mac should be even simpler: The drive could be mapped without the aid of the software installation disc.

My home Mac is a MacBook running OSX Tiger, not Leopard. WD included directions for this OS, and worked, to a point. In the Finder, WD said MyBook World would be represented by an icon in the Network folder. It wasn’t. Rather, it was hiding inside another folder inside the Network folder, which took me a little while to figure out. Then, after clicking the icon, I was prompted to enter a name and password and click “connect”—WD’s manual said the name and password are always “Admin.” This worked just fine. Then, WD said I would see a list of volumes from MyBook World to mount on my computer—and that there would only be one listed called Share. Well, that wasn’t the case on my machine: I saw Public and Downloads. So, I selected both of them and crossed my fingers. After a little while, those two shared volumes appeared on my desktop, along with a mount called Configuration, in the Finder. I could then drag and drop files this way.

Leopard installation is the easiest. Mybookworld appears automatically in the Finder under “Shared.” Clicking on MyBook World presents Configuration, Download, and Public listings. Why so simple? WD is using Apple’s own Bonjour interface.

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  • 0 Hide
    hpp_83 , February 18, 2009 3:11 PM
    I have an original MBWE and the interface and mionet are just terrible. I don't know if WD still restrict that file types you can share over the net (no media files etc.) but I was much happier after I had zapped the WD stuff and used the built-in linux--http://mybookworld.wikidot.com/start
  • 0 Hide
    Tomsguiderachel , February 18, 2009 4:26 PM
    hpp_83I have an original MBWE and the interface and mionet are just terrible. I don't know if WD still restrict that file types you can share over the net (no media files etc.) but I was much happier after I had zapped the WD stuff and used the built-in linux--http://mybookworld.wikidot.com/start

    hpp,
    Streaming filetypes was a big problem on the old version of the World Edition, but from my tests, the only limiting factor when it came to file types was what your Xbox 360/PS3/PC/etc could handle.

    Rachel Rosmarin
    Editor of Tom's Guide
  • 1 Hide
    stephenpmorgan , February 26, 2009 4:17 PM
    Don't judge the new MBWE by the old one. The file system has been completely re-written, from scratch. It is much, much faster, especially on a LAN. -- Steve Morgan
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , March 1, 2009 7:19 PM
    It would have been nice to see some independent tests performed on the ethernet speed of this device (read:not WDC's propaganda tests). As is witnessed from the customer reviews on newegg:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16822136138

    the "gigabit" ethernet speeds of the first version weren't anywhere close to even 100 megabit. So a verification of this problem being fixed would have been nice.

    Also, I don't get the assumption that the average "home" user would use it via wireless. Being a NAS device, it doesn't matter where you put this device in your home and for most people it's even easier to plop it down next to your router and plug it in than to put it else where and have to configure the wireless encryption on it.

    To me, the whole point of a 2TB NAS would be to store all of my media files and transferring a 4GB or 8GB movie file over 54Mb wireless would render having this thing pointless. And while we're on this subject, why was wireless N not included as an option??? That would have been a lot more useful than the older and much slower b/g.
  • 0 Hide
    a1exh , March 2, 2009 12:20 PM
    What a crappy review! The new MBWE beats all other NAS boxes for the capacity ($/GB) and performance ($/MBit/s) but they don't mention that!

    Why review a product that does not have native wireless support via a wireless connection? With no comparisons?
  • -1 Hide
    Skibumtx , March 30, 2009 2:25 PM
    Ok,

    To make this the perfect hub in my house I would also be able to connect my printer to the device and utilize it from any PC. My printer works great and I really don't want to replace it just to get a network-ready one. Anyone working on that?
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , May 15, 2009 12:28 AM
    Did you actually test this with a PS3 or just an XBOX360? I ask because I cannot see any files on my PS3.
  • -1 Hide
    kennedyusa058 , June 18, 2009 2:38 AM
    Why review a product that does not have native wireless support via a wireless connection?


    pret auto
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , June 26, 2009 1:08 AM
    if anyone knows how to get the mbwe working with the wd tv...please share...i'm cracking my head open trying to figure it out
  • 1 Hide
    teinturman , July 16, 2009 8:48 AM
    Hi , i agree with a1exh,

    The price review is comparing storage prices from Nas devices and direct attached storage but does not compare the price of this NAS with other NAS !

    The Mybook World WhiteLight is one of the cheapest NAS, can stream media over dlna, have correct performance when wired. ( it will probably go thru CPL instead of wifi when streaming to your console...)

    Additionnally, you can even add more features to your Mybook if you want to apply some modifications (voiding your warranty) described on some sites.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , January 30, 2011 12:44 AM
    Thanks for the pre-Leopard info advice for Backup Anywhere. Have just spent half the day pulling my hair out trying to get this to work on a Snow Leopard machine....with no luck! Time to dust off old-faithful running Tiger :) 

    Ang
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