Mark Zuckerberg Most Followed User on Google+

Google just launched its latest social networking effort last week. However, already, the service has garnered enough positive praise that the tech industry feels Facebook and Twitter should be worried. Whether or not that is genuinely the case remains to be seen, however, it seems Mark Zuckerberg has wasted no time familiarizing himself with the competition.

Just a couple of days after G+ opened in private beta, users noticed that the Facebook founder had also signed up for the service. His profile was quickly shared in public and private streams as people pointed his presence out to their respective Circles. The page was verified by tech blogger Robert Scoble who claimed to have spoken to Mark about its authenticity. This past weekend we learned that despite the fact that Mr. Zuckerberg has yet to post anything to his public stream, he is the most 'circled' person on Google+. So far, 34,759 people have added him to their circles. In contrast, Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, have 23,633 and 18,715 followers, respectively.

For those not in the know, the act of 'circling' someone is similar to Twitter's "follow". Contrary to Facebook's 'friend' feature, Circles does not require both people to accept before establishing a connection. Though Mark Zuckerberg is in my circles, he has not added me to his, so I can't see anything he's posting (unless he feels inspired to post something to his public stream). So who has Mark circled? Mostly people from Facebook. Everything else about his profile is hidden aside from his location (Palo Alto), his gender (male) and his introduction ("I make things"). He has no photos, Buzz updates, videos or posts set to public.

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  • He's probably there to look at (read:steal) google plus' features.
    Big surprise there.
  • Other Comments
  • He's probably there to look at (read:steal) google plus' features.
    Big surprise there.
  • Know your competition. Competition almost always benefit the consumers.
  • alexkitchI hate to sound like an ass, but no website of this much traffic/exposure should have such awful issues with basic spam robots. The fact that this is still an ongoing problem, after countless months/years, should serve as an absolute embarrassment to the developers of this site.How hard can it be to iterate a list of blacklisted strings for every new post? Even my IRC network (a protocol which is now 23 years old) is capable of automatically banning based on blacklisted spam strings.

    Because people cry when security is enhanced. People want 100% usability and simplicity while wanting 100% security but will CRY when strong security features are implemented. If you think development is so easy by just spatting "how hard can it be to iterate a list of blacklisted...bla bla bla" then why aren't you doing it? DDoS has been known for years but it is still extremely difficult to prevent. Will you come to everyone's rescue for a 100% awesome and expandable mechanism since you think it is easy???