FCC Releases Internet Speed Test Tool

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is striking back at ISP marketing practices by offering a free tool to consumers. Located here, the tool allows consumers to clock the speed of their Internet connection so that the FCC can compare the findings with ISP speed claims.

"The FCC's new digital tools will arm users with real-time information about their broadband connection and the agency with useful data about service across the country," FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said in a statement. “These tools help eliminate confusion and make the market work more effectively."

According to Reuters, the new digital tools follow an earlier FCC meeting back in September 2009. The FCC said that despite ISP claims, actual Internet speeds were estimated to lag as much as 50-percent during busy hours.

In addition to the broadband test, the FCC's new website also provides a way for consumers to report that they do not have broadband access in their area.

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    Top Comments
  • dman3k
    In a few months, ATT will be sued by FCC for not providing speeds it claims in has.
    24
  • pbrigido
    I don't need a tool to tell me that my internet connection is much slower than it should be.
    15
  • shin0bi272
    /me waits for the government take over of ISPs and downloads the soviet national anthem while he still has internet access...
    13
  • Other Comments
  • dman3k
    In a few months, ATT will be sued by FCC for not providing speeds it claims in has.
    24
  • NapoleonDK
    They will have to market the heck out of this in order for people to use it. Everyone I know just defaults to www.speedtest.net.
    1. Now that they have this tool out, will the FCC actually listen to any feedback and pursue ISP's who don't live up to their claims?
    2. Is this just a study of some sort? Are the FCC not allowed to use existing databases like Speedtest.net?
    3. Doesn't it say all over an ISP's EULA that the speeds are "UP TO ***Mbps" and that throughput "MAY BE LESS" under extreme usage?

    Seems like a government spending project to me. Then again, most people need something to complain about, and refuse to RTFM...
    11
  • pbrigido
    I don't need a tool to tell me that my internet connection is much slower than it should be.
    15