Android Increasingly a Growing Target for Mobile Malware

Google's mobile platform, Android, is increasingly becoming a key target for cybercriminals implementing malware.

According to a report from web security firm Blue Coat Systems, it found that 58 percent of Android malware is root exploits and rogue software. Android malware through malnets, which are networks that integrate malicious payloads, accounted for 40 percent of the total.

"The Android-based malware blocked by WebPulse included an Android root exploit and a variety of rogue Android software," Blue Coat noted. "Forty percent of Android malware was delivered via malnets, demonstrating how cybercriminals can successfully utilize embedded infrastructures to attack mobile users. In the most recent six months, WebPulse also blocked an increasing number of unique malicious Android applications."

The study also found that pornography is a key threat for Android mobile devices, but mobile users are said to visit porn sites less than 1 percent of the time.

In 2012, the most dangerous place for mobile users was pornography. More than 20 percent of the time that a user went to a malicious site, they were coming from a pornography site. It is important to note that mobile users are going to pornography sites less than 1 percent of the time. When they do visit pornography sites, though, they have a high risk of finding a threat.

Interestingly, when malware first moved to the Internet, pornography was one of the leading sources of it for desktop users. The prevalence of pornography as the leading threat vector for desktop users has ebbed, giving way to attacks that target much larger user populations, such as search engine poisoning.

In the desktop environment, pornography continued to fall as a threat vector as it became easier to target a large number of users on places like search engines or social networking sites.


Due to wireless phone carriers and handset manufacturers failing to launch existing software security fixes to devices within an acceptable time frame (some take at least a year), millions of Android smartphones are left vulnerable.

During the third quarter of 2012, the amount of Android malware increased by a significant proportion. A recent exploit, meanwhile, utilizes a user's own PC microphone to record victims.


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  • There is a difference between Malware and Scaremongering Apps. Security companies are repeating the malware mantra over and over, once for all do learn that there is ZERO Android Malware. You're faking a PC term and applying it to the Android ecosystem. Android Malware doesn't exist, those are just rogue Apps and those are installed by the user and NOT automatically like their PC cousins.

    Android uses Sandboxing and that also means that anti-virus apps are largely USELESS for protection (except for anti theft) for the very same reason, they don't have access to the low level system files, so they cannot protect anything.

    Those who claim that Android has 'Malware' have ZERO clue about how the platform works inside out.

    This is way too much, people don't know what crap they're sprouting.
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  • ^^ And of course it is Zak Islam trying to Scare people about android devices.
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  • yowanvistaThere is a difference between Malware and Scaremongering Apps. Security companies are repeating the malware mantra over and over, once for all do learn that there is ZERO Android Malware. You're faking a PC term and applying it to the Android ecosystem. Android Malware doesn't exist, those are just rogue Apps and those are installed by the user and NOT automatically like their PC cousins.Android uses Sandboxing and that also means that anti-virus apps are largely USELESS for protection (except for anti theft) for the very same reason, they don't have access to the low level system files, so they cannot protect anything.Those who claim that Android has 'Malware' have ZERO clue about how the platform works inside out. This is way too much, people don't know what crap they're sprouting.

    I believe you are missing the point. Since Malware is software that is intended to damage or disable; then yes there is Malware on Android. Also when Google upgrades Android it is not just to add more features. They are also adding more and more security features. The point they are trying to make is that Google puts out updates to Android but the phone manufactures don't pushed those updates (which contain security updates as well) out to the phone users. So if like me you are using an Android phone that is running version 2.3 it is not as secure as someone who has version 4.1. These days a phone is a PC in your pocket. So a lot of terms that used to only apply to PC's now apply to Smartphones as well.
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