China: U.S. Cyber-Espionage Accusations 'Unprofessional'

In the wake of a scathing U.S. intelligence report labeling China the "world's biggest perpetrator" of cyber-theft of industrial and military secrets, China has issued a terse denial of the accusations, calling them "unprofessional and "irresponsible".

China's Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei issued China's official response. "Online attacks are notable for spanning national borders and being anonymous," He said. "Identifying the attackers without carrying out a comprehensive investigation and making inferences about the attackers is both unprofessional and irresponsible. I hope the international community can abandon prejudice and work hard with China to maintain online security"

While no official policy changes have been proposed with regard to U.S./China relations, the report, released November 4th, represents a an escalation in the war of words between China and the U.S. over China's online conduct. The report alleged that both China and Russia are pursuing an official policy of online espionage against US business and government, but reserved special ire for China's alleged efforts. (Allegations, it should be added, not that unreasonable considering China's well known problem as a hub of pirated intellectual property sales.) Though the report acknowledges difficulty in determining the origin of hack attacks, it follows closely after accusations that China may have been behind hacker attacks on U.S. Satellites in 2007 and 2008 and and a major hacking attack against Google that occurred in June.

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  • V8VENOM
    First thing our IT folks do is block address ranges from China and many other potentially risky countries that either have NO policy/agency in place to combat hackers and/or actively encourage and support hacking. If your business and/or clients are not in these parts of the world, no need to leave the door open.

    China's denial is pretty funny ... even with IP spoofing it's easy enough to follow data packets going from A to B to C/D/E (aka A again). I'm not sure what's funnier, the Chinese government thinking that data isn't traceable or the US thinking their primitive attempts at hacking are really any threat.
    14
  • LuckyDucky7
    Maybe "irresponsible", but more importantly, are they accurate?
    I'm inclined to say yes, they are.
    You know all those copies of American technology, or stuff that looks very similar?
    You don't get that without breaking into a few networks or taking the design documents otherwise.

    But what gets me about these reports is that the US is just as bad.
    You don't think that the US hacks into and steals Chinese secrets? That the CIA doesn't conduct espionage in cyberspace? That American companies steal industrial secrets from Chinese ones?

    We seem to forget that the US is number one in spying on other countries. They've had lots of practice peeking at the USSR's advancements and knowing exactly what they're up to. And those people who have made that happen haven't retired yet.

    So if you believe for one second that the US doesn't have its hands in Chinese R&D labs and defense contractors, manufacturers, etc., you're sorely mistaken.

    The US can cry all it wants, but the truth of the matter is that they aren't as guiltless as they want you to believe.
    12
  • Other Comments
  • V8VENOM
    First thing our IT folks do is block address ranges from China and many other potentially risky countries that either have NO policy/agency in place to combat hackers and/or actively encourage and support hacking. If your business and/or clients are not in these parts of the world, no need to leave the door open.

    China's denial is pretty funny ... even with IP spoofing it's easy enough to follow data packets going from A to B to C/D/E (aka A again). I'm not sure what's funnier, the Chinese government thinking that data isn't traceable or the US thinking their primitive attempts at hacking are really any threat.
    14
  • sgtopmobile
    ANOTHER REASON TO THROW MY LIFE IN THE CLAUD.... F#CK IT!
    -12
  • LuckyDucky7
    Maybe "irresponsible", but more importantly, are they accurate?
    I'm inclined to say yes, they are.
    You know all those copies of American technology, or stuff that looks very similar?
    You don't get that without breaking into a few networks or taking the design documents otherwise.

    But what gets me about these reports is that the US is just as bad.
    You don't think that the US hacks into and steals Chinese secrets? That the CIA doesn't conduct espionage in cyberspace? That American companies steal industrial secrets from Chinese ones?

    We seem to forget that the US is number one in spying on other countries. They've had lots of practice peeking at the USSR's advancements and knowing exactly what they're up to. And those people who have made that happen haven't retired yet.

    So if you believe for one second that the US doesn't have its hands in Chinese R&D labs and defense contractors, manufacturers, etc., you're sorely mistaken.

    The US can cry all it wants, but the truth of the matter is that they aren't as guiltless as they want you to believe.
    12