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Google May Launch MP3 Store Before November

By - Source: Softpedia | B 7 comments

Google is reportedly trying to open an MP3 store before Apple launches its iTunes Match service.

The New York Times reports that Google is gearing up to launch an MP3 store to compliment its current music locker, aka Music Beta by Google.

According to the paper, Google is reportedly in negotiations with major record labels and eager to launch the virtual storefront within the next few weeks. So far there's no indication that the MP3 store will follow Amazon's own offering of automatically storing digital purchases in the customer's virtual locker indefinitely, and for free.

Although Google's Android currently commands the smartphone market, the platform lacks two major components that have made Apple's iOS so popular: the ability to purchase video and music straight from the device natively. Google recently opened a video rental service on the Android Market, but that still doesn't answer the consumer's call for actually owning movies and TV episodes to be watched on Android devices. On the music front, Amazon stepped in and saved the day with Amazon MP3 and its complimentary cloud storage.

Google is supposedly gunning to throw the doors open to its MP3 store before Apple launches its upcoming iTunes Match service. The search engine giant may also want to see the music store up and running by the time Ice Cream Sandwich starts to roll out on devices. But the launch may be delayed nonetheless because record studios still feel that Google hasn't addressed all of their concerns.

"We want to make sure the locker doesn’t become a bastion of piracy," one senior label executive said.

Google tried to launch a full-fledged music service before but failed to acquire proper licenses from the major record labels. The service was to allow consumers to match their current music collection against a vast central database that would in turn unlock high quality versions to be streamed or downloaded. But the negotiations dissolved based on piracy concerns and financial issues, thus Google launched the current Music Beta virtual locker in May which requires users to upload their own digital music.

As it stands now, Music Beta users can upload and store their music indefinitely and without storage limitations until Google lifts the "Beta" tag. Music can be streamed and/or downloaded to any Internet browser and/or Android device using the most recent Music app featuring the headphones icon (not the stock app with the speaker icon). To compensate for its lack of an actual storefront, Google also offers free music on a daily basis via the Magnifier blog that's dumped directly into the Music Beta locker.

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  • 3 Hide
    digiex , October 14, 2011 7:18 PM
    Why always MP3 which is not free, must use other "free" compression codecs like ogg, which i think sounds better than MP3 plus without the license.
  • 3 Hide
    Anonymous , October 14, 2011 7:49 PM
    "The New York Times reports that Google is gearing up to launch an MP3 store to compliment its current music locker"

    You mean complement, not compliment. Common mistake. Good article!
  • 5 Hide
    santfu , October 14, 2011 9:29 PM
    yeah man, flac is the way forward lossless music compression, larger file sizes but these days data is cheap. Open too. It always amazes me that people are happy to hear "MP3 Player" but their eyes glaze when you start talking about "compression". Education needs to catch up with the world.
    But then, maybe it's just that i'm boring ;) 
  • Display all 7 comments.
  • 1 Hide
    back_by_demand , October 14, 2011 9:38 PM
    digiexWhy always MP3 which is not free, must use other "free" compression codecs like ogg, which i think sounds better than MP3 plus without the license.

    Because even Amish people have heard of MP3s and they are trying to appeal to the broadest possible market, including technical retards who think that MP3 is the only digital music format.
  • 1 Hide
    PuckerFactor , October 15, 2011 12:11 AM
    I have no sympathy for the record industry, they have done nothing to improve the listening experience since the Compact Disc...nowadays its worse quality because it's all mp3 format. We still listen to music in stereo, yet the movie industry has 7-1 Surround Sound? I couldn't care leses about cloud servers and streaming it to my device...Apple and Amazon are marketing what they consider to be something we need...or what is the next evolution....but they are dumbing down the technical requirements to simply copy media to your device...all this Cloud server hype is in order to keep control of DRM and profits....and the technically inept sheep will allow it to happen.
  • 1 Hide
    bennaye , October 15, 2011 1:18 AM
    santfuyeah man, flac is the way forward lossless music compression, larger file sizes but these days data is cheap. Open too. It always amazes me that people are happy to hear "MP3 Player" but their eyes glaze when you start talking about "compression". Education needs to catch up with the world.But then, maybe it's just that i'm boring


    I agree with you fully. FLAC is honestly the best thing I've heard...EVER. Sure, file sizes often exceed 20MB for the average music file, but in return you are ensured that you don't lose much quality, if at all, from the recording studio, and it's free for anyone to use. And like santfu said, data is cheap. I still fondly remember my 128MB MP3 player, and how everyone thought that was the shit, and how I had to monitor the bitrates of my songs and rotate them regularly so I got to listen to my music collection of 50 songs.
    Now, 16GB is standard. Large file sizes just don't really matter anymore. Heck, some episodes of my anime collection exceed 1GB for just 30 minutes.

    Down with MP3, I say.
  • 0 Hide
    eddieroolz , October 18, 2011 4:28 AM
    Someone at Google better have a good reason for people using iTunes to switch to Google Music.
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