Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

IE 11 Heading to Windows 7 Too, Says MSFT

By - Source: Engadget | B 16 comments

Internet Explorer 11 will likely arrive on Windows 7 long after Windows 8.1 is distributed.

Microsoft confirmed with Engadget that Internet Explorer 11 won't be just a Windows 8.1 exclusive. The browser will eventually make its way to Windows 7 just like Internet Explorer 10. The company was reluctant to provide any kind of time frame, thus it's likely that users won't see the latest browser on Windows 7 until long after Windows 8.1 lands on PCs and tablets later this year.

It took quite a while for Internet Explorer 10 to reach Windows 7. The browser first appeared in preview form in April 2011 and then again in June 2011 for Windows 7 and beyond. However, the browser became a Windows 8 exclusive starting with the Windows 8 Developer Preview launched in September 2011, and then didn't reappear on Windows 7 (SP1) again until the Release Preview in November 2012. The final version for Windows 7 finally went gold in February 2013.

That said, the official launch of Internet Explorer 10 on Windows 7 lagged about four months behind Windows 8's final release despite the overall long development period. The big boost users will reportedly see when the browser finally arrives will be in the graphics department, as Internet Explorer 11 adds support for WebGL 3D rendering and MPEG Dash hardware acceleration for video streaming. There will also be improvements in the overall speed and battery life for mobile devices, but nothing major in the interface.

Of course, that's for the desktop version. Microsoft has poured a lot of time and money into the Modern UI version which, unlike the desktop browser, hijacks the entire screen by default. New to Internet Explorer 11 will be side-by-side windowing, tab sync across all Windows 8-based devices, means to permanently show the address bar and open tabs, and a way to reopen closed tabs. Websites will also be able to create animated Live Tiles for the browser.

Internet Explorer 11 will be available alongside Windows 8.1 when it's released as a final version later this year. However, customers can check out a preview version of the browser after installing Windows 8.1 Preview which was launched this week.

Discuss
Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the Streaming Video & TVs forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

This thread is closed for comments
  • 0 Hide
    Vorador2 , June 27, 2013 1:06 PM
    Firefox and Chrome approve this.
  • 0 Hide
    Spooderman , June 27, 2013 1:12 PM
    No thanks, not until they add extension support to go along with the better speeds.
  • 0 Hide
    booyaah , June 27, 2013 1:24 PM
    wow, MS actually adding in WebGL to IE?? I'm surprised. I remember their program director basically saying they were not adding WebGL since you could use DX extensions (which sucked hard). Basically they didn't want people going open source over DirectX, only problem is they never developed WebDX.

    Okay, so MS continues to play this perpetual 'catch-up' game with Chrome/Firefox functionality wise. I honestly would love to get off Chrome, because I always feel like every aspect of my privacy is being poked and prodded by Google.

    My main problem with IE is that the number of browser extensions are slim to nil. They don't have a nice add-on store like Chrome has, no equivalent no-script add-on, I would also rather store my bookmarks (2000+) to SkyDrive instead of Google servers. But ultimately, I guess it really doesn't matter now, since both companies participate in PRISM anyways.
  • Display all 16 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    booyaah , June 27, 2013 2:01 PM
    wow, MS actually adding in WebGL to IE?? I'm surprised. I remember their program director basically saying they were not adding WebGL since you could use DX extensions (which sucked hard). Basically they didn't want people going open source over DirectX, only problem is they never developed WebDX.

    Okay, so MS continues to play this perpetual 'catch-up' game with Chrome/Firefox functionality wise. I honestly would love to get off Chrome, because I always feel like every aspect of my privacy is being poked and prodded by Google.

    My main problem with IE is that the number of browser extensions are slim to nil. They don't have a nice add-on store like Chrome has, no equivalent no-script add-on, I would also rather store my bookmarks (2000+) to SkyDrive instead of Google servers. But ultimately, I guess it really doesn't matter now, since both companies participate in PRISM anyways.
  • 0 Hide
    killerclick , June 27, 2013 2:24 PM
    Really? They're not going to make their new browser exclusive to a sub 5% market share failed operating system? They're such visionaries!
  • 0 Hide
    hiryu , June 27, 2013 2:47 PM
    If what this website said is true, get Firefox instead of MS or Chrome to avoid PRISM
    http://prism-break.org/
  • 0 Hide
    alextheblue , June 27, 2013 5:08 PM
    Hiryu, if you think using Firefox is going to protect you from the NSA... lawlz. Although I do think Firefox is a good browser (although it has some hiccups now and then and I hate how they've engaged Google in an idiotic version number war), it won't make much of a difference when they can snoop at other points along the path.

    "Websites will also be able to create animated Live Tiles for the browser."

    Combined with smaller tile sizes, that's actually pretty nifty! The new option for permanently open tabs and address bar is a welcome addition too, at least on the tablet. On my gaming PC I always use desktop browsers. But the Modern UI variant of IE10 (and soon 11) is great for touch, and with these various improvements it'll be just about perfect.
  • 0 Hide
    SteelCity1981 , June 27, 2013 5:25 PM
    I haven't used ie in years so I could care less if it gets supported or not.
  • 0 Hide
    Avus , June 27, 2013 5:36 PM
    Of course MS need to make IE11 available for Win7. Unless MS want IE11 become the smallest market share in the browser war...
  • 0 Hide
    montosaurous , June 27, 2013 7:42 PM
    Now they just need a Windows 7 SP2. Gonna be a long 7 years for support without an SP2 & SP3.
  • 0 Hide
    Azn Cracker , June 27, 2013 7:51 PM
    still have IE 9 installed. Although i rarely use it. IE 10 just didnt work for me.
  • 0 Hide
    beoza , June 27, 2013 11:16 PM
    My main browsing is done on Firefox, but it does suffer from hiccups now and then so I use IE. I could never stand the extremely spartan UI of Chrome and how they buried the options for their browser. Microsoft really needs to get addons and extensions in their browser to really compete with Firefox and Chrome. What I'd really like to see all browsers do though is completely block all tool bars from being installed, these things make doing my job (Tech Support) a pain! Even though you can tell a customer to press F6 they will invariably think you want them to press the F and 6 keys...even if you tell them where it is. Tool bars really should go the way of the Dodo. Improvements to a browser's speed and new tech like WebGL and MPEG Dash are nice but get rid of those damn tool bar extensions!
  • 0 Hide
    Cryio , June 28, 2013 12:25 AM
    If so, than IE11 will most certainly be the last IE to launch on Windows 7.

    XP - IE 6 - 8
    Vista - IE 7 - 9
    W7 - IE 8 - 11
    W8 - IE 10 - 13/4 (probably)
  • 0 Hide
    captaincharisma , June 28, 2013 9:22 AM
    MS must realize nobody is switching to windows 8
  • 0 Hide
    captaincharisma , June 28, 2013 9:29 AM
    MS must realize nobody is switching to windows 8
  • 0 Hide
    Christopher1 , July 2, 2013 6:29 AM
    Not going to happen, Spooderman. Microsoft's stance is that extensions to the browser, unless they are written by they themselves, cause more problems than they are worth.
Tom’s guide in the world
  • Germany
  • France
  • Italy
  • Ireland
  • UK
Follow Tom’s guide
Subscribe to our newsletter