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Getting Things Done With Software

Tom's Guide to Getting Things Done with Software

Introduction

The Getting Things Done (GTD) mantra is a great one for the start of a new year. It’s not just about making a to-do list of things that never get done. It’s about organizing what you need to get done in such a way that you can relieve some stress and perhaps be more efficient in getting your tasks accomplished.

“Getting Things Done” isn’t a cliché; it’s actually the name of a popular personal productivity book by David Allen. Allen’s approach has spurred a cottage industry of software applications designed to help users implement the GTD methodology.

At its core, GTD is about unloading everything you need to do and making decisions about all the things you need to do. Certainly, not everything needs to be done immediately; tasks can be deferred but they do need to be tracked. While the approach also includes the concept of projects that need to be completed, of greater importance are the tasks that need to be done and the context in which they occur.

There are a lot of different approaches in software for trying to implement some form of GTD methodology. Some stick closely to Allen’s guidelines while others stray from the path. From a practical point of view though, it really is all about productivity and task management. In this review, we’ll take a look at eight different approaches including Backpack, Tracks, Tudumo, Hiveminder, SimpleGTD, MyToDos, Remember the Milk and GTD for Outlook.

  • What about Sandy? http://iwantsandy.com works with jott and twitter.
    Reply
  • michiel79
    Just like Sean Kerner mentioned in his conclusion
    Then again, getting things done isn’t about spending all your time trying to figure out how to get thing done. It’s about listing your tasks and taking action.
    , I felt the need to strip a ToDo list from all it's (in my eyes) cluttering options and keep it all in 1 easy-on-the-eyes list.

    With that in mind I created what can be tried out here:
    http://www.michielhuiskens.nl/todo/?autoLogin=freetoedit

    It would be very much appreciated if people tried it out and let me know what they think.

    (I know it needs a scrollbar option for when there are more items then fits the screen, don't worry, that is on my personal ToDo list :-))
    Reply
  • michiel79
    Just like Sean Kerner mentioned in his conclusion
    Then again, getting things done isn’t about spending all your time trying to figure out how to get thing done. It’s about listing your tasks and taking action.
    , I felt the need to strip a ToDo list from all it's (in my eyes) cluttering options and keep it all in 1 easy-on-the-eyes list.

    With that in mind I created what can be tried out here:
    http://www.michielhuiskens.nl/todo/?autoLogin=freetoedit

    It would be very much appreciated if people tried it out and let me know what they think.

    (I know it needs a scrollbar option for when there are more items then fits the screen, don't worry, that is on my personal ToDo list :-))
    Reply
  • Did this review really review anything at all? Reading this review just gets in the way of actually getting things done.
    Reply
  • I implemented GTD with Backpack (by the same guys that do basecamp) and it works great from me.
    Reply
  • Thinking Rock is a very authentic reproduction of GTD workflow in a dekstop app: http://www.thinkingrock.com.au/

    The only knock I have against it is that it does not have server/syncing component for easily accessing your review.
    Reply
  • Hi,

    For implementing GTD you might try out this new web-based application:

    http://www.gtdagenda.com

    You can use it to manage your goals, projects and tasks, set next actions and contexts, use
    checklists, schedules and a calendar.
    A mobile version is available too.

    As with the last update, now Gtdagenda has due date for tasks (you'll see in the calendar on the right if you have tasks due today), task notes, and Email & Print support.

    Hope you like it.
    Reply