Microsoft Mobile Marketshare Declines After WP7 Release

Last Thursday comScore released data showing key trends in the U.S. mobile phone sector during the three month average period ending June 2011. According to the numbers, there's good reason why Microsoft and Apple may be secretly campaigning against Google on the mobile OS front: Android numbers are growing while iOS remains somewhat level and Windows Phone 7 continues to plummet.

During the last three months of 2010, Microsoft introduced Windows Phone 7 to the public and commanded 8-percent of the smartphone OS market. But by the end of March 2011, that number dropped to 7.5-percent. ComScore's report now indicates that Microsoft’s share has fallen yet another 1.7-percent by the last day of June, owning just 5.8-percent of the mobile OS market.

Meanwhile, Google's Android OS jumped from 34.7-percent recorded in March 2011 to 40.1-percent recorded in June 2011, a 5.4-percent increase. Apple saw a 25.5-percent smartphone OS market share in March, and then a 1.1-percent increase of 26.6-percent in June. It's likely Google may always have the larger number simply because the OS is not only free to manufacturers, but installed on more than several hardware sets – iOS will always remain an Apple exclusive and installed on a limited number of devices.

The report also reveals that by the end of June, 25-percent of North America's mobile subscribers owned a Samsung smartphone. LG was in second place with a 21.3-percent share followed by Motorola (14.5-percent), Apple (8.9-percent) and RIM (7.9-percent). Overall smartphone usage has grown since the January-March quarter, with 39.5-percent of the surveyed subscribers downloading apps (up 2.2-percent) and 26.9-percent playing games (up 1.2-percent).

One thing the comScore report didn't point out was that there are currently only eight Windows Phone 7 smartphones on the market. These include the HTC Desire, the HTC Arrive, the Samsung Focus, the LG Quantum, the HTC Surround, the Dell Venue Pro, the HTC HD75 and the HTC Trophy. That said, the declining market share doesn't spell certain doom for Microsoft's mobile efforts: it means that there's a large-but-growing number of Android handsets and the WP7 portfolio may not be growing fast enough.

ComScore gathered its information by surveying more than 30,000 U.S. mobile subscribers. To see the results, head here.

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  • Microsoft have produced such a nice OS. I just hope they can break the stereotypes that they have stuck to them.

    Their marketing team needs to change I think...
    11
  • Other Comments
  • I'm really hoping WP7 will take off
    9
  • Maybe they should buy HTC also.
    2
  • Microsoft have produced such a nice OS. I just hope they can break the stereotypes that they have stuck to them.

    Their marketing team needs to change I think...
    11