James Cameron: Tablets will Push 3D Into Homes

Film director James Cameron, who seemingly rebooted the 3D industry with the release of his film Avatar, says that glasses-free, portable 3D is the key to pushing the technology into homes and part of our daily lives.

"There is a lot of technology that has to be worked out before we have high quality, full resolution autostereoscopic screens that are big screens, in the 40, 50, 60-inch range," he told TechRadar during an interview at this year's International Broadcasting Convention (IBC). "Now smaller screens that are in the desktop, laptop, tablet size, where it is basically a single user model, you can do those right now. And you are going to see a lot more of those products coming to market over the next year and so."

Eventually consumers will begin to think of 3D as a technology that doesn't necessarily require glasses in every application -- just in certain circumstances. "I think ultimately the tablets and laptops, people can toggle between 2D and 3D, and it will just become part of their diet," he added.

Also key to mass adoption of 3D in homes worldwide is the introduction of passive glasses. "Instead of having to pay a premium at the cinema, the general public have to fork out on the glasses which are expensive," he said. "Passive glasses are here and the quality is improving all the time. The fact that they are throwaway means this technology could be critical."

To read the full interview, head here.

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    Top Comments
  • Personally I don't see the appeal of 3D because after 10 minutes of watching a 3D movie I completely forget about the 3D and just enjoy the film. If anything, when I do notice the 3D it takes me out of the film.
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  • Personally I don't see the appeal of 3D because after 10 minutes of watching a 3D movie I completely forget about the 3D and just enjoy the film. If anything, when I do notice the 3D it takes me out of the film.
    13
  • 40 years ago people said the same about color TVs, and before that - about color cinima.
    -4
  • Cameron's assessment is divergent from what is happening at movie theaters. Many movie goers are opting for 2D screenings of 3D films. To me, this indicates that people do not see the value in 3D, and would rather pay less for the same film in 2D since 3D adds little to the film. About the only thing that 3D does is drain money from movie goer pockets and infuse that money into the pockets of theaters and movie makers.

    I find it interesting that people like Cameron and other people who earn a lot of money are consulted like they are experts. Cameron makes good films, but in my opinion, he should stick to film making. His area of expertise is narrow just like that of most other people who have made a ton of money from pursuits that are very narrow. As such, those people are only experts at what they made money at, e.g., Cameron and film making, and not at the broader areas that the media "consults" them on.

    Personally, I thought the 3D for Avatar was purely bling and added nothing to the film. I am not saying it was not a great film; it was, however, a great story for which 3D does little.
    9