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W3C Announces Plan to Make HTML5 Standard By 2014

By - Source: Worldwide Web Consortium | B 11 comments

The Worldwide Web Consortium (W3C) said on Thursday that it has proposed a plan to move the HTML5 spec into its official "Candidate Recommendation" status by 2014, and then HTML5.1 by 2016. So far this plan hasn't been approved by the HTML Working Group (WG), but it's open for discussion within the group along with the Accessibility Task Force, and the WAI Protocols and Formats Working Group.

For the W3C to get HTML5 into the Candidate Recommendation stage on time, it will need to rip out some of the less stable aspects and reassign them to the later HTML 5.1. This shouldn't be too much of a hassle given that HTML 5 has been "modularized" over the years, as chunks have already been spun off like Web Workers, WebSockets, Microdata and many others which have since become separate, standalone W3C specifications.

"Modularity plays an important role in the plan progress," the W3C blog stated. "To enable features to evolve independently and rapidly, the group will make use of what it calls 'extension specifications.' Some extension specifications may end up being published as stand-alone documents that are part of the 'HTML family of specifications'; others may be re-integrated into the "baseline" HTML5 specification."

To determine what stays in the HTML5 spec, the plans proposes that the group needs to determine which features are likely to meet the "Public Permissive" CR exit criteria. The group must then create a "stable HTML5.0" draft which includes just the "stable" features, and omits the remaining "unstable" features. After that, they will create an HTML5.1 editor’s draft which is a superset of the stable HTML5.0, but with the "unstable" features included instead of omitted, and also with any new proposed features included.

Then for HTML5.1 in 2016, the HTML WG will repeat the process, throwing the unstable parts into HTML5.2. This streamlined process should mean that additional features will reach the Recommendation stage quicker than before the plan was proposed. That said, if the plan is adopted, then the HTML WG expects to advance HTML5.0 to Candidate Recommendation mode in Q4 of this year.

To read the proposed plan, head here.

 

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  • 8 Hide
    dameon51 , September 24, 2012 4:33 AM
    I don't make web standards often...

    (-_-)

    ...but when I do, I take years longer than I should need.
  • 1 Hide
    phatboe , September 24, 2012 5:35 AM
    Have they figured out what video/audio codecs they will support?
  • 1 Hide
    aftcomet , September 24, 2012 5:51 AM
    phatboeHave they figured out what video/audio codecs they will support?


    Hopefully AVC!
  • Display all 11 comments.
  • -3 Hide
    tenshin111 , September 24, 2012 6:53 AM
    phatboeHave they figured out what video/audio codecs they will support?

    What do you mean by 'they'? The standard does not promote any codecs - it is up to browser makers to add specific codec support. These days it is WebM, Theora and MP4-AVC(H.264) but different browsers support different ones:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML5_video
  • 3 Hide
    Vorador2 , September 24, 2012 7:12 AM
    tenshin111What do you mean by 'they'? The standard does not promote any codecs - it is up to browser makers to add specific codec support. These days it is WebM, Theora and MP4-AVC(H.264) but different browsers support different ones:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML5_video


    And that's why the standard is still incomplete.
  • -2 Hide
    tenshin111 , September 24, 2012 8:29 AM
    Vorador2And that's why the standard is still incomplete.


    No, this is not the issue. HTML 5 defines semantics for the element and it's expected behaviour - not the actual implementation. It is up to browser manufacturers to choose specific codecs and use them.
  • 2 Hide
    Zingam_Duo , September 24, 2012 8:33 AM
    Why is it so difficult to center an element on the page still?
    Why is everything so inconsistent yet?

    It looks like total patchwork...
  • 0 Hide
    brucek2 , September 24, 2012 9:42 AM
    tenshin111No, this is not the issue. HTML 5 defines semantics for the element and it's expected behaviour - not the actual implementation. It is up to browser manufacturers to choose specific codecs and use them.

    Your statement is accurate but I don't understand how you feel its not an issue. It means that no content provider can reach more than a fragment of the web audience using a single encoding format. Yes, they have the unattractive option of encoding everything in multiple formats, but between that huge drawback and other omissions, the end result is that we're right back where we started: the best way to serve video is going to be using something other than HTML standards. In the end, they failed to define a standard for web video, there is not likely to be one for some time, and to everyone's loss (except perhaps the rights holders looking to further monetize those patents.)
  • 0 Hide
    cookoy , September 24, 2012 10:47 AM
    The gradual release of stable features and modular approach should mitigate the world-wide wait. Looks like 2014 will be the year XP and Flash finally retire.
  • 0 Hide
    Northwestern , September 24, 2012 3:00 PM
    There are still websites that are IE only back during the Internet Explorer vs Netscape era.
  • 0 Hide
    ravewulf , September 24, 2012 4:09 PM
    Zingam_DuoWhy is it so difficult to center an element on the page still?Why is everything so inconsistent yet?It looks like total patchwork...

    That's a CSS problem, not HTML.
    HTML5 is a whole lot nicer to work with than previous versions.
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