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Microsoft Gives a Taste of Mango on iPhones and Androids

By - Source: WMPoweruser | B 28 comments

Hopeful Windows PHone 7 customers can test-drive the mobile Microsoft OS via an HTML5 app on Android and iOS devices.

Want to see what Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 has to offer, but you just don't to drag yourself down to a local Verizon or AT&T store? You're in luck, as the Redmond company has devised of a way for potential customers to sample the new OS using an Android or iOS-based device without forcing users to install a demo app.

By heading to http://aka.ms/wpdemo on a mobile device, consumers can load up an HTML5-based version of the Windows Phone 7.5 "Mango" operating system. Everything essentially works without pulling data off the user's phone, offering a taste of the platform's major hubs including Phone, People, Messaging, Outlook, Calendar, Family and so on.

To make navigation easy for newbies, a blue dot serves as a makeshift tour guide, demonstrating how the major features work -- like reading and "liking" Facebook feeds, answering calls, sending text messages and so on -- by inviting users to interact. The demo presumably feels like an actual Windows Phone 7 device, sliding screens left, right, up and down rather fluently.

Ultimately each Metro hub serves as its own little individual demo, and when completed, users are asked if they want to return to the main menu, or shop for phones.

Clever.

But will it sell any phones? That's a good question, as the Metro interface looked better in the Android browser than it did in Apple's Safari. Still, hopeful Windows Phone 7 consumers should test-drive an actual handset rather than experience a semi-accurate taste on non-WP7 devices.

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Top Comments
  • 17 Hide
    _Cubase_ , November 30, 2011 9:33 PM
    I gave it a go using my windows phone. I still liked it.
  • 15 Hide
    southernshark , November 30, 2011 10:02 PM
    Its probably a good thing that Steve passed away before he saw this.
  • 15 Hide
    rantoc , November 30, 2011 9:20 PM
    My next phone will be a wp7 phone, borrowed a friends a couple of days and he was close to not get it back =)
Other Comments
    Display all 28 comments.
  • 14 Hide
    klavis , November 30, 2011 9:14 PM
    I gave it a try, I liked it. Might think about getting a windows phone when my contract is up.
  • 15 Hide
    rantoc , November 30, 2011 9:20 PM
    My next phone will be a wp7 phone, borrowed a friends a couple of days and he was close to not get it back =)
  • 17 Hide
    _Cubase_ , November 30, 2011 9:33 PM
    I gave it a go using my windows phone. I still liked it.
  • 11 Hide
    toastninja17 , November 30, 2011 9:35 PM
    That's actually pretty cool, used on my 4S
  • 15 Hide
    southernshark , November 30, 2011 10:02 PM
    Its probably a good thing that Steve passed away before he saw this.
  • 5 Hide
    silver565 , November 30, 2011 10:54 PM
    You have to give microsoft credit, they're doing very well with WP7, and producing websites like the one listed, will only bump competition further
  • -6 Hide
    jowah , November 30, 2011 11:13 PM
    Agreed, competition is a good thing... But, the world has already given them billions in excessive licensing fees, and exemption from obligatory adherence to global standards... I don't have to give them credit... they are, and have always been, a disruption to the natural and elegant evolution of technology.
  • 1 Hide
    silver565 , November 30, 2011 11:25 PM
    Ah, but would you agree that WP7 is actually very good and well made?
  • -3 Hide
    jowah , November 30, 2011 11:40 PM
    I haven't used one yet; I just make fun of Microsoft by default because my faith in them erodes a little more every time I interact with their products. If and when I ever use one, I will be the first to admit that I was wrong *if* it is indeed a well made product, and it doesn't add significant cost to the device, and it uses standard protocols, and it plays nice with other information systems.
  • 2 Hide
    silver565 , November 30, 2011 11:54 PM
    jowahI haven't used one yet; I just make fun of Microsoft by default because my faith in them erodes a little more every time I interact with their products. If and when I ever use one, I will be the first to admit that I was wrong *if* it is indeed a well made product, and it doesn't add significant cost to the device, and it uses standard protocols, and it plays nice with other information systems.


    I'm pleased you aren't a brainwashed loony who thinks that everything Microsoft make is an evil corporate piece of rubbish.

    I'm a Linux man myself, however I have taken quite a liking to WP7. It's very well made.
    I do hope it takes off quickly as it has a lot of promise.
  • 3 Hide
    zybch , December 1, 2011 12:20 AM
    I've been using WP7 for quite some time now and just upgraded to the HTC Titan. Pretty much everyone I've shown it to that runs an iPhoney or android device has been duly impressed, after all the boring grid of icons is just EXTREMELY uninteresting and belongs 5 years in the past, NOT on a modern smartphone.
    Apple for one haven't done a damn thing to advance their phones in any real meaningful way since the first one came out.

    I've never had an app crash or misbehave badly while using WP7, but on my android devices it was a necessity to have a task killer located prominently on the home screen for when it inevitably screwed up.
  • -3 Hide
    jowah , December 1, 2011 12:42 AM
    I'm a Linux guy too. :)  Hopefully I'm not brainwashed, but maybe I am a bit of a cynic when it comes to Microsoft. It's my belief that human beings, as a species, are capable of creating things that are much better than what Microsoft produces. Unfortunately, it seems like a large number of tech users think the word "Microsoft" is synonymous with "software." I know that this sounds crazy to some people, but I truly think Microsoft stifles natural improvement to an extent. Not unlike the way Wal-Mart stifles the free market. The general reasons for my diminishing respect for Microsoft are...

    -Non-standard and MS proprietary protocols are ubiquitous in their software, which makes interfacing with it unnecessarily problematic. (e.g. compare Exchange/Outlook to Zimbra Collaboration Suite)

    -Everything leads to another license (e.g. CALs)

    -Flawed and limited logic in software (e.g. compare Visio to LucidChart)

    -Many Microsoft products are just plain unstable, but nobody notices because it's always been that way.

    -Its expensive for no good reason

    -Everybody uses it, because everybody uses it... that's a loop... and loops are bad

    I don't like to be cynical, but after so many years of this... it just gets old.
  • 0 Hide
    darkavenger123 , December 1, 2011 12:43 AM
    Test it with my HTC Desire....doesn't seems to work properly. All i know i have one vendor who regrets getting the phone due to many limitations. But maybe Mango fixed this. Anyway, i am not impressed...it's diffrent, but doesn't mean it's better. Just looks boring and the tiles kills all possibility of cool design and live wall paper. No thanks. I am sticking to my Android.
  • -1 Hide
    SchizoFrog , December 1, 2011 1:08 AM
    My main issue is that MS and partners seem to be dropping the ball in regards to hardware. It is nearly Christmas (THE ideal time for new phones to come out) and yet we barely have the Nokia Lumia 800 and as much as I was looking forward to it and still 'like' it, there are much better and more powerful phones out there.
    I have been putting off getting a new phone and it looks like I'll be waiting a little longer. I want to compare Android against WP7 when WP7 has a device that can compete with the HTC Sensation XL/XE or the Samsung Galaxy SII.
  • 0 Hide
    jla0 , December 1, 2011 1:44 AM
    The demo works with Google Chrome (tested on Windows) if people want to see it from a PC.
  • 2 Hide
    ben850 , December 1, 2011 1:56 AM
    schizofrogMy main issue is that MS and partners seem to be dropping the ball in regards to hardware. It is nearly Christmas (THE ideal time for new phones to come out) and yet we barely have the Nokia Lumia 800 and as much as I was looking forward to it and still 'like' it, there are much better and more powerful phones out there.I have been putting off getting a new phone and it looks like I'll be waiting a little longer. I want to compare Android against WP7 when WP7 has a device that can compete with the HTC Sensation XL/XE or the Samsung Galaxy SII.


    If Microsoft can make Mango run on 1GHZ single-core CPU's, why would they throw in anything bigger that drains the battery more quickly?
  • 2 Hide
    adamboy64 , December 1, 2011 1:57 AM
    This was a really neat idea on Microsoft's part.

    I've been keen on leaving Android in the past - using it for 6 months or so was enough for me to decide it's not for me.

    This just makes me far more keen for a WP7 Phone.
  • 0 Hide
    tuffjuff , December 1, 2011 4:24 AM
    jowahI haven't used one yet; I just make fun of Microsoft by default because my faith in them erodes a little more every time I interact with their products. If and when I ever use one, I will be the first to admit that I was wrong *if* it is indeed a well made product, and it doesn't add significant cost to the device, and it uses standard protocols, and it plays nice with other information systems.



    Sounds just like me about half a year before I bought an iPhone 4. Never thought I'd own an Apple product (aside from an iPod) after all those years of despising them, only to find out that I hated the lag and lack of apps on Android even more than when I was using their phones.
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