Hurry! Amazon just knocked $300 off this Alienware 34-inch QD-OLED curved gaming monitor

Alienware AW3423DWF
(Image credit: Future)

The Alienware 34 QD-OLED gaming monitor is a killer high-speed curved monitor, and right now you can get one for more than 25% off at Amazon.

That's significant because the Alienware AW3423DW is on sale for $889 at Amazon, which knocks over $300 off the price of this gorgeous display. The QD-OLED panel itself delivers crisp, speedy visuals at up to 175Hz with support for HDR, so it's great for playing games or watching movies. It's also available on Dell's website for the same price, if you'd prefer an alternative to ordering from Amazon.

Alienware 34" QD-OLED Gaming Monitor: was $1,299 now $889 @ Amazon
This beautiful display is a great curved gaming monitor, and at this price it's a killer deal. In our Alienware 34 QD-OLED gaming monitor review we celebrated the beautiful QD-OLED panel, high refresh rate (175Hz over DisplayPort or 100Hz via HDMI), elegant design and easy-to-use interface. Just be aware that this monitor has no HDMI 2.1 ports (so no support for 120Hz or variable refresh rate if you plug your gaming console in) and takes up a lot of space on your desk.
Price check: $889 @ Dell

Alienware 34" QD-OLED Gaming Monitor: was $1,299 now $889 @ Amazon
This beautiful display is a great curved gaming monitor, and at this price it's a killer deal. In our Alienware 34 QD-OLED gaming monitor review we celebrated the beautiful QD-OLED panel, high refresh rate (175Hz over DisplayPort or 100Hz via HDMI), elegant design and easy-to-use interface. Just be aware that this monitor has no HDMI 2.1 ports (so no support for 120Hz or variable refresh rate if you plug your gaming console in) and takes up a lot of space on your desk.
Price check: $889 @ Dell

This beautiful monitor makes games look great on its 34-inch QD-OLED panel (check out our what is QD-OLED explainer for more details) with an 1800R curve mounted to a simple V-shaped stand. It's an elegant yet easy-to-assemble design, which I love — you just pop the display into the appropriate mounting bracket on the stand and you're good to go, no tools required.

Alienware 34 Curved QD-OLED Gaming Monitor on a desk showing a game being played

(Image credit: Future)

It also comes with a VESA mount adapter, which you will need screws to use, and in my personal experience it can be tricky to mount this display to a monitor arm or wall mount because the monitor's mount is in a recessed area on the rear, which can be tricky to slide onto a mount. Not impossible mind you (I've got an Alienware 32 QD-OLED monitor mounted to my monitor arm as I type this), just tricky and worth knowing if you plan to mount one of these on your own.

You should also know this monitor doesn't have built-in speakers, so you'll want either a pair of the best headphones you can buy or some decent speakers when gaming. And while it has plenty of ports, including 4 USB-C ports, a DisplayPort and 2 HDMI ports, they're just HDMI 2.0 ports. That's fine for basic monitors, but without HDMI 2.1 ports this monitor will not support the advanced features of some devices, like the 120Hz refresh rate and variable refresh rate support offered on the PS5 and Xbox Series X.

But if you plan to do a lot of PC gaming and need a great curved monitor for your setup, you could do a lot worse than this beautiful QD-OLED panel. While this new low price may be the new standard for this display, as it's since been superseded by the slightly more capable (and nearly identical) Alienware AW3423DWF QD-OLED. But since the biggest difference between that $999 display and this slightly older $889 model is the upgrade from HDMI 2.0 to HDMI 2.1, you can save yourself a cool $110 if you don't care about HDMI 2.1 by opting for this slightly older Alienware AW3423DW QD-OLED monitor.

Alex Wawro

Alex Wawro is a lifelong tech and games enthusiast with more than a decade of experience covering both for outlets like Game Developer, Black Hat, and PC World magazine. A lifelong PC builder, he currently serves as a senior editor at Tom's Guide covering all things computing, from laptops and desktops to keyboards and mice.