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DVDs, Blu-Ray Discs to Get More Anti-Piracy Warnings

By - Source: ICE | B 56 comments

The anti-piracy warning shown in DVD and Blu-ray movie discs has been extended and will be integrated in new releases beginning this week.

The National Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Coordination Center as well as "six major American movie studios" agreed that the FBI warning screen will also show the logo of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and will state:

"The unauthorized reproduction or distribution of this copyrighted work is illegal. Criminal copyright infringement is investigated by federal law enforcement agencies and is punishable by up to 5 years in prison and a fine of $250,000."

There will also be a second screen with the IPR logo and read: "Piracy is not a victimless crime. For more information on how digital theft harms the economy, please visit www.iprcenter.gov."

"Our nation's film and TV business is critical to our economy," said U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Director John Morton. "Its creativity and imagination have made American entertainment one of our greatest exports over the decades, but criminals are increasingly engaging in new forms of digital theft. Law enforcement must continue to expand how it combats criminal activity; public awareness and education are a critical part of that effort."

The addition of HSI to the warning label is designed to highlight the agency's effort to battle counterfeit products and "dismantle the criminal organizations behind such illicit activity."

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  • 41 Hide
    icepick314 , May 11, 2012 1:11 PM
    ever heard of "Locks only keep innocent people out"?

    what good are those warnings if the consumer bought the media legitimately?

    all they're doing is pissing of the adults and kids who want to watch the movie but have to wait additional 5 minutes ON TOP of 15 minutes of previous warnings, trailers, and commercials...
  • 35 Hide
    john_4 , May 11, 2012 1:09 PM
    So the FBI is not enough they need a logo of the gestapo at homeland security huh. So now you are a terrorist if you copy a movie.
  • 34 Hide
    alexmx , May 11, 2012 1:11 PM
    it is ironic how they force the people who lawfully buy the discs since they aren't allowed to skip the warnings and go directly to the movie.

    On the other hand, pirated content regularly allows this since all the locks are removed.
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  • 35 Hide
    john_4 , May 11, 2012 1:09 PM
    So the FBI is not enough they need a logo of the gestapo at homeland security huh. So now you are a terrorist if you copy a movie.
  • 41 Hide
    icepick314 , May 11, 2012 1:11 PM
    ever heard of "Locks only keep innocent people out"?

    what good are those warnings if the consumer bought the media legitimately?

    all they're doing is pissing of the adults and kids who want to watch the movie but have to wait additional 5 minutes ON TOP of 15 minutes of previous warnings, trailers, and commercials...
  • 34 Hide
    alexmx , May 11, 2012 1:11 PM
    it is ironic how they force the people who lawfully buy the discs since they aren't allowed to skip the warnings and go directly to the movie.

    On the other hand, pirated content regularly allows this since all the locks are removed.
  • 27 Hide
    eiskrystal , May 11, 2012 1:12 PM
    Quote:
    on how digital theft harms the economy,


    Did it harm as much as lax law enforcement and regulation of the criminal activity of the banks, which were then bailed out? One does have to wonder. Perhaps there wouldn't be so much copying if people had any money left to buy the real thing.

    Quote:
    Its creativity and imagination have made American entertainment one of our greatest exports over the decades


    Porn, reboots and remakes. Yup very imaginative. That's why I haven't stepped foot in the cinema for over a year.

  • 27 Hide
    sabarjp , May 11, 2012 1:15 PM
    Yep, adding more filler before you can see your movie is a good incentive to buy legit.

    I've been streaming and using digital downloads for a while now. A few weeks ago I bought some blu-rays to see if the video quality improvement was worth it. I swear it took 10 minutes just to get past all the filler garbage.

    Needless to say, I will not be playing blu-rays any longer. If I do use the discs, they'll all be ripped and the garbage edited out.
  • 26 Hide
    Anonymous , May 11, 2012 1:33 PM
    What criminal would take the time to read that warning?
  • 25 Hide
    becomecooler , May 11, 2012 1:46 PM
    Punish the innocent ; )
  • 11 Hide
    CaedenV , May 11, 2012 1:57 PM
    eiskrystalPorn, reboots and remakes. Yup very imaginative. That's why I haven't stepped foot in the cinema for over a year.

    That is a little harsh, as there were a few good movies that came out last year... like... um....
    *gets on IMDB for a moment*
    well, X-Men was ok... and Arrietty was alright for those into Anime... perhaps you have a point, none of the movies from 2011 were worth paying retail prices for...
    And looking at this year all we have is Avengers, Prometheus, and The Hobbit. 2 pretty rough years in a row...

    ... so who exactly is watching this crap that Hollywood thinks that they can stay in business with such drivel?
  • 4 Hide
    eddieroolz , May 11, 2012 2:01 PM
    You can add as much warning as you want. I'm still not buying home media.
  • 18 Hide
    mrpijey , May 11, 2012 2:01 PM
    Geez... these people never learn do they... add more junk and I'll equally step up my efforts to remove the junk before dumping the movies to my media centre (I always use ISO mode so I can keep some menus and stuff, but I always remove all the commercials and "you're a terrorist if you buy this shite" messages).

    Good job MAFIAA.
  • 23 Hide
    leakingpaint , May 11, 2012 2:13 PM
    omf...we already buy the DVD, now you have to "rip it" to get rid of the annoying messages.
  • 20 Hide
    djscribbles , May 11, 2012 2:36 PM
    I'm glad we've finally figured out how to defeat piracy once and for all!

    (since you can't hear the sarcasm, I'll just let you know it is there)
  • 14 Hide
    classzero , May 11, 2012 2:50 PM
    Meh. straw that made me stop buying.
  • 18 Hide
    Kamab , May 11, 2012 3:00 PM
    Thank you DoJ for your continued efforts to stop the purchasing of DVDs and Blu Ray
  • 5 Hide
    NapoleonDK , May 11, 2012 3:12 PM
    What's a DVD? ;) 
  • 12 Hide
    guyjones , May 11, 2012 3:18 PM
    How is this at all logical? Pirates who are heavily involved in illegal reproduction, transmittal or sale of media material are not actually watching the movies in question, and thus these warnings only affect the law-abiding citizen who has paid for the product and is sitting down to watch a movie, and now has to wait an even longer amount of time to watch a pointless PSA (in addition to those obnoxious trailers and ads which can't be bypassed by going straight to the menu screen). And even if the pirates are watching the movie, are they going to be swayed from their criminal ways by a PSA? Please, spare me. It's akin to those recorded subway announcements in NYC that warn us that "Groping a passenger is a crime," or some words to that effect. The pervs who actually engage in that sort of behavior are not going to have a sudden epiphany from hearing it and change their ways. It's just naive in the extreme.

    The fallacy at work here is even more self-evident -- criminals -- including media pirates -- by their intrinsic nature, do not obey laws. They care not about society's behavioral restrictions and have made a conscious choice to disregard them. So, preaching about federal piracy laws to the crooks who are heavily engaged in piracy and are utterly indifferent to the laws that criminalize such conduct is the height of stupidity.

    How about merely enforcing the law against those who are breaking it, instead of preaching about it to the law-abiding masses? Actions speak louder than words.
  • 3 Hide
    elbert , May 11, 2012 3:22 PM
    If there going to enforce unauthorized reproduction then shouldn't the movie industry replace damaged or outdated media for a small fee? I have a few hundred movies on VHS and DVD I would love to get upgraded to Bluray. With the movie industry striving to make cheaper shorter life media who should be blamed for their customers wanting to watch that which they paid for? Movie company's need to be held accountable for the part they play. My old VHS tapes never had a warning that the sale was only for the life of the media. Many of my older DVD doesn't have warning of media life so why shouldn't a reproduce a backup copy of something I paid for?
  • 1 Hide
    jindicator , May 11, 2012 4:35 PM
    My question is, why can't the DVD or Blu-Ray players keep track of this and show the warning say every 10th time a video is played? Or maybe it can keep track of the fact that you our your kids have already watched this DVD or Blu-Ray a hundred times and then never show you the warning again whenever you play the disk. Its not like the message changes that much from one showing to the next or even across different movies. If someone has read it once or skipped over it a hundred times, seeing it again, more than likely isn't going to make them change their stance on the subject. Encode the disk with the warning, but let the disk player choose when to show the warning. Sure someone is going to modify the disk player to make it never show the warning messages, but in the end, they were going to do that anyways.
    Its analogous to home security. What's the cheapest way to protect your house? Put up a "Monitored by ADT" or some other company sticker. It may prevent some people from robbing your place, but no amount of stickers or actual security systems will prevent a determined criminal from robbing your place if they want to.
    Here's the problem with putting it on every disk. The people that pirate the stuff never see this anyways, because they're removing it. And if they do show up at a friends house and see the warnings, their first question is going to be "What is this and why can't you skip it?" Which will immediately be followed up by "Why would you pay for the real thing if its going to waste 10 minutes of your time when you can get an exact copy for cheaper w/o all the warnings so you can see the film right away?" If you put the warnings on the disk player and it puts out the warning every couple of times a disk is played, then even if the disk is illegal and the warnings have been removed from the disk, everyone still gets the warnings but they aren't as annoying - unless the warnings are popping up every time you try to play the disk. In fact, it should be the other way around, if the disk is legitimate, then the warnings shouldn't show at all, but if the disk doesn't have the warnings encoded on it, then the disk player should put up the warning every time you try to play the disk.
  • 8 Hide
    Trialsking , May 11, 2012 4:52 PM
    AnyDVD can fix that problem
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