The Best Smart Home Devices That Work with Google Home

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Dan Moren & Monica Chin
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  • billgolden
    Well the pop-up talked about 28% off for a USB hub that also accepted SmartCards, etc. But alas nothing to be found when I click on the popup. Oh I waded through 30 screens offering a few interesting products but mostly just amazed that someone wasted their time and someone else's money developing a product that is virtually useless or already perfected.

    This is not the first time I have clicked on a Tom's Guide popup only to have nothing related to the popup message appear, but plenty of offers to sell a myriad of other products. You know coming on to people with one product but only showing something else is nothing more than "bait and switch." That terms was coined for the used car industry, which as a profession, is one of the lowest trusted professions in the US.

    Like that feeling you get realizing your moral center?

    I write a monthly column for a trade journal. Circulation is about 100,000. Your going to love my next column, but they say any publicity, even bad publicity, is good for business. Be sure and let me know what you think.

    Bill Golden
    [don't post your phone# on the forum]
  • COO2CTO
    Hi Bill,

    I did not have any such "bait and switch" - just the tag line of "The Best Smart Home Devices That Work With Google Home". I'm on cellular Verizon Business, "Unlimited"(22 GB/month), Comcast Business 1GB WiFi (high performing co-ax). I saw this article first thing this morning using my mobile Chrome app on my Samsung Note 8, connected to my business WiFi.

    It may be the types of accounts you have that allow for what you see vs. what I see, or the settings you might want to check. I am aware that when my phone operates outside our offices, using the same mobile app, but outside our WiFi, the cellular filters are more weak and I see some advertising crap (perhaps since Verizon is sloppy about their filters) that I do not see while connected to our business WIFi.

    What you describe - can you dig in behind it and see who sent it and submit that info to your comms providers? It reads like an ad that fits a "spoofing" pattern or SpearPhish type of "animal" looking for you to click on it.

    They (hack community) are on a blanket campaign and I'm training staff for what to look for. It's tricky for sure.