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WD Brings Personal Cloud to Smartphones, Tablets

Tuesday WD launched two mobile apps for its My Book Live line of network-capable external drives that allow users to send and receive files from their "personal cloud" remotely using an iPad, iPhone, iPod touch or Android compatible mobile device. Users can also head to this secure website to access their files remotely from any PC or Mac computer.

"Using My Book Live, users can share files, stream media, and access content anywhere with no monthly fees and secure in the knowledge that their data resides in their own home under their exclusive control," the company said. "In addition, the WD 2go Pro app enables private sharing of files with friends, family and colleagues. Almost any file can be shared, from pictures and personal videos to work documents and presentations."

The free WD 2go app is merely a file "viewer," allowing users to open and view presentations, documents, photos and even stream media. The $2.99 Pro version of the app adds to the basic foundation with premium extra features including Clipping (aka offline access on a mobile device), automatic synchronization, content sharing and 4-digit pass code security.

As indicated, WD's line of My Book Live external drives creates a local cloud-based storage solution on a home or small business network, allowing networked users to store and retrieve data from one dedicated location. This line also features a built-in media server that streams music, photos and movies to any DLNA-certified multimedia device such as a WD TV Live network media player, Blu-ray disc player, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and connected TV.

Now available, WD's My Book Live line includes 1 TB ($159.99), 2 TB ($199.99) and 3 TB ($249.99) models which are compatible with Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Mac OS X Leopard, Snow Leopard, or Lion, as well as DLNA/UPnP enabled devices.

"Consumers demand the anywhere, any device access they can get from 'the cloud,' but don't want to pay monthly fees or lose control of their personal data. They want access to all their files without worrying about what files are synched to what device," said Jim Welsh, executive vice president and general manager for WD's branded products and consumer electronics groups. "With the new WD 2go mobile apps and WD's My Book Live personal cloud storage, consumers now have a simple and fast way to securely store, share, and access all their digital content from their mobile devices wherever they are."

  • _Cubase_
    The cloud (or as the hacker community likes to call: "Cloud 9"), has just got personal.
    Reply
  • The Greater Good
    This is the only type of cloud I'd ever use.
    Reply
  • Wish I Was Wealthy
    I like WD,but I just don't like the Cloud idea & it is a way of moving closer towards the Cloud concept.
    Reply
  • amk-aka-Phantom
    This is just stupid. It's a normal HDD/NAS branded with the stupid "cloud" tag so that more n00bs brainwashed with the "cloud" BS would buy it. There's nothing new about it. I could have that kind of "cloud" 4 years ago if I wanted to.
    Reply
  • Vladislaus
    Guess WD must take a look ate the definition of a computing cloud. A single hard drive connected to the web doesn't make it a cloud.
    Reply
  • Wish I Was Wealthy
    I just can't believe how few posts up there,there are about this article. This is so vital to talk about how the cloud concept is getting closer & how they are slowly doing it by moving in this new tech for us to get use to.
    Reply
  • Camikazi
    VladislausGuess WD must take a look ate the definition of a computing cloud. A single hard drive connected to the web doesn't make it a cloud.Yea it does, the cloud is just some HDD sitting somewhere connected to the net so you can access it from anywhere. That is all the cloud is, the rest is all hype and marketing, it's offsite data backup that you can access anywhere, anytime. The only thing the big clouds have over this is more HDDs and redundancy, but this is just a stripped down basic cloud.
    Reply
  • eddieroolz
    Neat I guess, but in essence its a glorified NAS.
    Reply