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iPad Could Disrupt Your Sleep; Kindle Not So Much

One of the big questions people have asked about the iPad is related to books and using the device as an ereader. Many fear that the iPad's screen is far too bright for reading for long periods of time. The Kindle and other similar models of ereader use e-paper displays for this very reason.

iPad owners will likely tell you reading on the device is quite actually comfortable, however, new information indicates that it could disrupt your sleep cycle. The LA Times cites sleep experts who say the light emitted by the iPad's bright tells your brain to stay alert. The same is true of bedside lamps and televisions but the difference is that your iPad is not just sitting next to you or across the room; it's right up in your face all the time.

Frisca Yan-Go, director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center in Santa Monica, told the LA Times that really, you shouldn't be playing with light-emitting gadgets before bed.

"The take-home lesson is that insomnia and electronics gadgets emitting light should not [be] mixed before bedtime," he told the paper in an e-mail. "Kindle is better for your sleep," he said later.

  • dxwarlock
    so in other words..lighting thats on (ipad or bedside lamp) when used for reading can keep you awake?

    they spent money on this research, to point out that bright lights can keep it from being dark in your sleep environment?

    next on the slate for review. if engaging in the activity of jogging can disrupt your ability to sleep while doing so.
    Reply
  • insider3
    iPad owners will likely tell you reading on the device is quite actually comfortable

    haha, I never would have guessed they would say such a thing.
    Reply
  • mavanhel
    Why does this article discuss just the iPad? If you have a laptop the exact same effect should be seen as well. So mentioning the iPad is just to attract readers?
    Reply
  • smlong
    DXWarlockso in other words..lighting thats on (ipad or bedside lamp) when used for reading can keep you awake?they spent money on this research, to point out that bright lights can keep it from being dark in your sleep environment?next on the slate for review. if engaging in the activity of jogging can disrupt your ability to sleep while doing so.You apparently didn't comprehend the article. The research showed that using light emitting electronic devices BEFORE going to sleep can impact your sleep cycle. The research also showed that the Kindle/eInk readers do not exacerbate this effect as much as the iPad. While watching a TV or reading w/ a light source prior to bed can affect your sleep cycle, the effect is much more pronounced with the iPad since it is "right in your face."
    Reply
  • waylander
    DXWarlockso in other words..lighting thats on (ipad or bedside lamp) when used for reading can keep you awake?they spent money on this research, to point out that bright lights can keep it from being dark in your sleep environment?next on the slate for review. if engaging in the activity of jogging can disrupt your ability to sleep while doing so.
    Ummm.... it does state before bed...

    Frisca Yan-Go, director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center in Santa Monica, told the LA Times that really, you shouldn't be playing with light-emitting gadgets before bed.

    and I completely agree. Any activity that tells your body it should be awake would make getting to sleep harder.
    Reply
  • HolyCrusader
    I must be an anomaly then - I have a fairly regular sleep cycle despite the bright, LCD Monitor I use. What sometimes causes me to get to be a little later isn't the bright monitor, but what I might be doing at the time. Playing a game, or doing some creative writing will keep me awake far longer than me just browsing the internet.

    I wonder if their study took that into account? You can't do much more on the Kindle other than read something, whereas an iPad, Laptop or even my old Palm T|X can do so much more. So did their test groups actually DO the exact same thing on their given devices?
    Reply
  • mianmian
    So light emitting devices are no good to sleep, but light reflecting ones are OK?
    should I use a mirror to read the Ipad?
    Reply
  • JohnnyLucky
    Interesting development.
    Reply
  • maestintaolius
    Melanopsin is strongly affected by blue light (and blue light sources like lcd screens and light bulbs) and it is what regulates your sleep cycles and pupil light response. Basically, it is what tells you to be sleepy when it is too dark to see anything so the lion doesn't surprise you and eat you.

    Anyone who has owned lizards is probably familiar to this concept (the red night bulb. Anyone who has attended a star party is also probably familiar to this because you use red flashlights to find your way around so you don't affect other people's night vision as badly as a white light would. This is also why I use a dim red light at night to read when I'm before I go to sleep. A Kindle, since it's a passive display, would work better in this case than a light emitting display would.
    Reply
  • nebun
    turn the brightness down...problem solved
    Reply