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Kansas OKs Google's Internet-Based TV Service

The state of Kansas has approved Google's application to provide an internet-based home TV service on its 1 GB/s Google Fiber network in Kansas City, Kan. The application was approved by the Kansas Corporation Commission on Friday, and follows a similar approval by the Missouri Public Service Commission on March 1 for Kansas City, Mo.

In the Kansas application, Google reportedly said it will "utilize national and regional video headend facilities (programming collection points) to send IPTV (internet-based television) across a private (internet protocol) network to subscribers." National content may include the likes of Disney, Time Warner and Discovery.

"Google Fiber has represented that it is currently capable of providing video programming to all households within the requested service area," the KCC wrote in a Friday order.

A Google spokesperson indicated to the Kansas City Business Journal that the approvals don't mean the company plans to take on the local cable company, but that the video franchise licenses will be in place in case Google does decide to offer such a service. Currently the company is still "exploring offerings" for the high-speed network's upcoming launch in at least one unspecified neighborhood sometime early this summer.

But even if/when Google does plan to launch an Internet-based TV service, the company may have to somehow get over the FCC hurdle. Both states require video service applicants to file identification information with the FCC. However, Google's Fiber network isn't a cable operator under the FCC's definition. The Kansas commission's order even reports that Google hasn't filed identification information.

Google's data center in Council Bluffs may eventually become one giant DVR for those Kansas City residents subscribing to Google's rumored TV service. The search engine giant is supposedly working to create a Cloud TV service, replacing DVRs and TiVo set top boxes. Google Fiber can make this happen, as its 1 GB/s speed will make retrieving all that stored video manageable as multiple televisions in hundreds of homes within a single neighborhood stream all that video at the same time.

Google originally applied for franchises to offer video services in Kansas City, Kan. and Kansas City, Mo. back in February right after the company began stringing lines for its 1 GB/s network in those two cities. Local opponents reportedly have 15 days to ask the commission to reconsider its decision regarding a video service by filing a petition.

  • pedro_mann
    So Jealous. I'm tired of Comcast's monopoly and failure to innovate in a timely manner.
    Reply
  • noobalert
    pedro_mannSo Jealous. I'm tired of Comcast's monopoly and failure to innovate in a timely manner.The same can be said about every other cable company nation wide. Even worse are those like me stuck with a Hole in the wall local provider, ATMC of Brunswick County, North Carolina is the 2nd worst provider in the entire world. I requested HBO Go, and they said yeah we carry HBO you don't have to go anywhere special to get it.
    Reply
  • drwho1
    Price/Cost?
    Data Caps?
    Reply
  • house70
    noobalertThe same can be said about every other cable company nation wide. Even worse are those like me stuck with a Hole in the wall local provider, ATMC of Brunswick County, North Carolina is the 2nd worst provider in the entire world. I requested HBO Go, and they said yeah we carry HBO you don't have to go anywhere special to get it.LOL, dude, you need to put their answer on reddit or crack.com. Epic!
    Reply
  • house70
    drwho1Price/Cost?Data Caps?I doubt there are any caps; they can't cap a TV service, nobody can, unless they don't want business.
    Reply
  • drwho1
    house70I doubt there are any caps; they can't cap a TV service, nobody can, unless they don't want business.
    But... will this then be a separate bill?
    Feels like paying for internet twice! LOL
    Reply
  • __-_-_-__
    I really don't understand US model. But it seams it doesn't work. In developed countries there's a thing called competition which is good for the consumer. you can choose from dozens of companies and you have fibre, adsl and cable available everywhere, not to mention 4G services. With competition everyone wins. Usually what happens is that X company starts a new offer (more speed or Y service or less expensive) the others follow to avoid losing costumers, then another company does the same and so on. That's why bandwith caps and traffic shapping hurts the companies. I don't understand why kansas as to say OK to google to offer one more service. In my country every ISP has a triple play offer. Actually it's much more then triple, they offer a lot more services like mobile tv, 4G, free wifi networks, video on demand, and so on.
    Reply
  • nbelote
    It's too bad about the USA, the telco/cable companies don't share resources... i.e. once AT&T has laid fiber somewhere, they won't rent it out to Verizon so they can have customers in the same area as well. Verizon, if they wanted to put services in the area, would have to lay all new fiber and some of the time there's no room for it since (in this example) AT&T's is already taking up the only room that was available for all that fiber.

    Google, on the other hand, has gone in and laid all their own fiber and are offering it at the prices they want to offer it at, which are apparently quite competitive. Do other companies have the ability to do this? Yes! Will they pay for it? Heck, no.
    Reply
  • geminireaper
    nbeloteIt's too bad about the USA, the telco/cable companies don't share resources... i.e. once AT&T has laid fiber somewhere, they won't rent it out to Verizon so they can have customers in the same area as well. Verizon, if they wanted to put services in the area, would have to lay all new fiber and some of the time there's no room for it since (in this example) AT&T's is already taking up the only room that was available for all that fiber.Google, on the other hand, has gone in and laid all their own fiber and are offering it at the prices they want to offer it at, which are apparently quite competitive. Do other companies have the ability to do this? Yes! Will they pay for it? Heck, no.

    Actually Verizon Lays there own fiber cable also. Verizon FioS.
    Reply
  • alidan
    i love the idea of a dvr but for everything, you know... kind of like NETFLIX, sadly they will fight to the bitter end to stop this from happening... i hate the world i live in.
    Reply