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Stimulus check 2 eligibility could include millions more Americans — see if you qualify

Stimulus check 2 eligibility
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Stimulus check 2, or the direct payment initiative included in the HEALS stimulus bill, could reach 2 million more people than the first stimulus check thanks to the support of select Senate Republicans. 

Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), and Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) are in favor of getting stimulus checks to the 2 million American citizens married to foreign nationals without social security numbers, reports Fox Business. Even if their income landed below the IRS's eligibility threshold, these people did not receive the $1,200 CARES Act stimulus check. 

“No American should be denied a federal stimulus check because they are married to a foreign national who is not a U.S. citizen,” Rubio said in a statement. “Amid a global pandemic, we must ensure Americans are receiving the funds appropriated by the federal government to keep families afloat during this national crisis.”

These 1.7 million citizens were barred from the first round of stimulus checks at the White House's direction, according to The Hill. We could see the White House push back on Rubio and Tillis, potentially contributing to a dreaded stimulus check 2 delay.

With the the second stimulus check's negotiations underway, the parties involved in discussions could be looking to advance their own interests. As a result, a stimulus check 2 date is unclear even with the Senate expected to go public with its proposal this week. 

Stimulus check 2 eligibility: Will you qualify?

Whether Rubio and Tillis's proposal for joint-filers married to foreign nationals without social security numbers to qualify for stimulus checks materializes, millions of Americans will likely see a second stimulus check before the end of the year.

Although the Senate has not issued its formal response to the House's HEROES Act, GOP leaders have clued us in on what the framework for a second stimulus check could look like.

“We're talking about the same provision as last time, so our proposal is the exact same proposal as last time," said U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who is negotiating with lawmakers on behalf of the White House.

Last time refers to the first CARES Act, which designated $1,200 to every person earning under $75,000 per year and joint-filers earning under $150,000 per year, with prorated amounts for those earning up to $99,000 and $198,000, respectively.

You can use this stimulus check 2 calculator to see if you're eligible for the next stimulus check and how much you can expect to get.