Skip to main content

Teen Jailed for Facebook Death Threat

Is freedom of speech becoming a luxury of the past? That may be the case, especially when used in a "cyber-bullying" verbal attack online. As seen with the suicide of Megan Meier stemming from comments made on MySpace, Internet harassment can be lethal, and now many countries are taking action against individuals harassing others online.

The latest cyber-bullying incident has now made 18-year-old Keeley Houghton the first person to be jailed in Britain due to bullying on a social networking site. According this article, Houghton actually posted a death threat in regards to Emily Moore on Facebook; Houghton had bullied Moore for four years at school prior to the virtual threat.

"Keeley is going to murder the bitch," Houghton wrote on her Facebook page. "She is an actress. What a ------- liberty. Emily ----head Moore."

According to Prosecutor Sara Stock, there was an altercation between the two teens before the Facebook posting. Apparently, Houghton approached Moore at a pub and asked for a "huggle" despite two previous convictions relating to her vendetta against Moore.

"I'll give you something to ring the police about," Houghton threatened when Moore refused the hug and threatened to call the police if Houghton didn't leave her alone.

Houghton pleaded guilty to harassment charges and now serves three months in a young offenders' institution. She was also banned from contacting Moore for five years.

  • mlcloud
    This is almost as worthless as that
    Author of 'Skank' Blog to Sue Google for $15 M article I read on this one really starting-to-appear useless site...
    And I think I'll make a similar comment.

    Nothing ever makes sense anymore.
    Reply
  • justiceguy216
    mlcloudNothing ever makes sense anymore....and your comment proves this. Not to slam you, just you may want to try reading that aloud, it's rather hard to follow.
    Reply
  • Kaiser_25
    I think this is kinda reasonable, 3 months punishment...ya that girl needs to grow up maybe some not so hard time will do that. BUT this does set a dangerous precedence. I think threats of violence are unacceptable but good old shit talking should still be ok lol.
    Reply
  • mlcloud
    justiceguy216...and your comment proves this. Not to slam you, just you may want to try reading that aloud, it's rather hard to follow.
    Nothing ever makes sense anymore. Is there something misleading about that? I don't see how there's any other meaning to derive from it.
    Reply
  • P_haze420
    Internet, serious business.
    Reply
  • chaohsiangchen
    Death threat is absolutely intolerable and not protected under freedom of speech. Who ever she is, deserves jail time for what she did.

    Reply
  • calmstateofmind
    okay.....so i really dont see the big deal. its not like she was in person saying that she was going to kill her. it was over facebook. if the girl was serious then she would have said it in person, of which she has had the chance to do so for over four years. people talk a lot more shit when they can do it over the internet because they have something to hide behind.

    also, to me this somewhat ties into what kids are listening to and watching these days. its pretty much a given that if somebody is listening to rap 24/7, and it talking about killing people all the time or drugs or sex, then the person becomes numb to it and it doesn't seem like a big deal to them anymore. and its the same way with movies....or even tv for that matter. if the govt. expects for kids to not say such things then they shouldnt be allowing them to be exposed to it as much as they are right now, and the amount of exposure is increasing too. its not so black and white.
    Reply
  • dingumf
    You people take internet far too seriously.

    Reply
  • Raid3r
    No, I don't agree that the government should be making laws that remove the responsibility of protecting yourself away. WTF am I talking about when was the last time a saw a real merry-go-round..oh. sigh
    Reply
  • Zenthar
    To me, article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights should prime above all else: All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood. Based on that one should still be able to critic and question one's intention or motives without attacking the person directly.
    Reply