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Twitter Intros Age Screening To Block Underage Followers

Twitter has introduced a new feature called Age Screening. As the name implies, it's an online tool for brands and other age-sensitive parties to determine whether a follower meets a minimum age requirement in a way that is consistent with relevant industry or legal guidelines.

The tool arrives by way of a collaboration between Twitter and Buddy Media. The two have reportedly worked together on the project over the last few months at the request of brands whom have asked for native age screening. Bottom line is that it's a free tool for alcohol brands and marketers who want to advertize on Twitter, but need a quick way to filter out the underage audience.

According to Buddy Media, the service has been in beta testing for the last month. Now the two parties are formally launching the solution and making it available to any marketer.

"The Twitter and Buddy Media solution solves a challenge many marketers have faced in confirming their followers are of age to follow their brand," Buddy Media said on Thursday. "Until now, companies have had to develop their own custom, one-off 'age-screening' solutions. The result has been a patchwork of solutions with different approaches, processes and levels of success."

The system works like this: when a Twitter user clicks to follow a brand (like @JackHoney, @CoorsLite and @MillerLite), the person automatically receives a Direct Message from the brand leading to age.twitter.com. The user visits the linked verification page and enters their age; this information is not shared with the brand.

Thus, if the user meets the age threshold set by the brand, they will automatically follow the brand. If the user does not meet the age threshold the brand has set for their country, they will be unable to continue following the brand.

"This solution is also convenient for Twitter users. Once a user has supplied their age through this process, they won’t have to do so again if they want to follow other brands using this solution," Buddy Media said. "The result is a solution that makes marketers’ lives easier, without creating extra work for the brand or the user."

Companies interested in using this feature are encouraged to sign up at https://age.twitter.com/ to submit their brand for approval.  

  • mrmaia
    It looks like the exact same system used by porn sites to keep underage viewers out. Twitter will see a lot of people claiming they were born January 1 :D
    Reply
  • kniped
    Like most age screening methods this sounds pretty much useless. I don't think there is a minor on the face of the planet that hasn't figured out to lie about their birthday whenever they reach one of these screenings....
    Reply
  • super d spamalot
    It doesn't matter if people lie about their age to bypass the screening. Companies don't care who sees what as long as their ass is covered. All it does is put the responsibility on the viewer so they can't get sued by horrible parents who let 4 year old tommy seeing boobies and naughty language.

    Of course, it should be assumed by default that the responsibility is ALWAYS on the viewer and none of this should be necessary, but since Americans refuse to take responsibility for their own lives and insist on putting the blame on everyone else for their crappy kids, we will always have to live with this nanny nonsense on the internet.
    Reply
  • freggo
    Homeland Security just announced a similar scheme.
    On arrival from international flights you will be asked if you are a US citizen.
    If you answer "yes" you will be allowed thru immigration.
    If you answer no they will send you to a holding cell with computers where you can Google the correct answer; then try again.
    Reply
  • livebriand
    ashley6347like Virginia responded I didnt know that anyone able to make $9783 in 4 weeks on the internet. did you read this websiteI don't think people of ANY age should fall for that scam.
    Reply
  • livebriand
    Of course, this won't be very effective. On my T-mobile prepaid account, on the other hand, I have to supply my address, last 4 digits of my SSN, etc if I want to turn off filtering, and I have to be 18. Aside from people who know how to change their DNS server, that's pretty effective.
    Reply
  • 11796pcs
    I never got this crap. What are we actually "protecting" kids from? The truth is, we're not protecting anyone, we're just censoring things because we think they're bad. Give kids all of the facts and then let them decide what they want to do instead of just censoring things so that kids will be even more curious about them.
    Reply
  • danwat1234
    11796pcsI never got this crap. What are we actually "protecting" kids from? The truth is, we're not protecting anyone, we're just censoring things because we think they're bad. Give kids all of the facts and then let them decide what they want to do instead of just censoring things so that kids will be even more curious about them.

    But the minds of children aren't fully developed yet. Exposing them to adult things might not be the best thing. This exposure might affect them long term
    Reply
  • pepe2907
    livebriandOf course, this won't be very effective. On my T-mobile prepaid account, on the other hand, I have to supply my address, last 4 digits of my SSN, etc if I want to turn off filtering, and I have to be 18. Aside from people who know how to change their DNS server, that's pretty effective.
    But then T-Mobile operates this way in your country and uses something else in mine...
    You get the picture.
    Reply
  • eddieroolz
    I'm surprised Twitter didn't get into trouble earlier for the lack of this ineffective but required screening. It's like that M-rated video game sites; one simply enters that they're born on January 1, 1915.
    Reply