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PlayStation VR Extrasensory Suit Lets You See, Feel Sound

I've played Rez Infinite on PlayStation 4 and I've played it on PlayStation VR. However, this the first time that I've ever played it on a PS4 with a PS VR strapped into a full-bodysuit packing 24 integrated actuators.

The music-driven light show took place in Sony's Future Lab during SXSW, led by none other than world-renowned game designer and programmer Mark Cerny.

Dubbed the Rez Infinite + Synesthesia Suit, this exhibit takes the phrase "get into the game" to a whole other level. In case you're unfamiliar with the term, synesthesia refers to the phenomenon where a person has extraordinary sensory reaction. For example, some people can taste colors or shapes while others might hear sounds as hues.

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But at the Sony Future Lab, synesthesia means that 3 out of 5 of my senses are being accessed in the suit. The built-in actuators are designed to thump, pause and activate the integrated LEDs with the music. So whenever I blasted a group of futuristic enemies undulating towards me at dizzying speeds, the resulting musical riff activated specific spots in the suit. It was like wearing an EDM track. 

Once I got the hang of it, I found myself blasting baddies to the beat and having a damned good time doing it. When I focused on the sensations coming from the suit, I noticed that the vibrations were nuanced depending on the instrument. Stringed instruments, for example, offered a lighter vibration compared to the deep bass punctuation the game's soundtrack. 

And while Rez Infinite is good by itself or virtual reality, the definitive experience is being strapped into a full bodysuit that allows you to truly feel the game and the music.

Sherri L. Smith

Sherri L. Smith has been cranking out product reviews for Laptopmag.com since 2011. In that time, she's reviewed more than her share of laptops, tablets, smartphones and everything in between. The resident gamer and audio junkie, Sherri was previously a managing editor for Black Web 2.0 and contributed to BET.Com and Popgadget.