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Logitech G Pro X Superlight review

The Logitech G Pro X Superlight is the best ultra-lightweight gaming mouse yet

Logitech G Pro X Superlight review
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Logitech)

Our Verdict

The Logitech G Pro X Superlight marries a stylish design with excellent lightweight functionality, although it’s extremely expensive.

For

  • Incredibly light
  • Smooth, sleek design
  • No extraneous features
  • Long battery life

Against

  • Expensive
  • Not that different from G Pro Wireless

Tom's Guide Verdict

The Logitech G Pro X Superlight marries a stylish design with excellent lightweight functionality, although it’s extremely expensive.

Pros

  • + Incredibly light
  • + Smooth, sleek design
  • + No extraneous features
  • + Long battery life

Cons

  • - Expensive
  • - Not that different from G Pro Wireless
Logitech G Pro X Superlight specs

Max DPI: 25,600
Buttons: 5
Size: 4.9 x 2.5 x 1.6 inches
Weight: 2.2 ounces

EDITOR'S NOTE: The Logitech G Pro X Superlight won "best gaming mouse" in the Tom's Guide Awards 2021 for gaming.

The Logitech G Pro X Superlight is a mouthful of a name for an extremely no-frills mouse. Logitech’s latest wireless gaming mouse weighs in at an unbelievably light 2.2 ounces, eschewing everything from textured grips to RGB lighting in the process. That may sound like a tough compromise for a $150 mouse, but the tradeoff is incredibly worthwhile: The Superlight is the lightest gaming mouse on the market that doesn’t use a garish honeycomb design.

Having put the Superlight through its paces, I can confirm that it’s an excellent mouse, even if it’s not radically different from the Logitech G Pro Wireless mouse that preceded it. Still, if you’ve been waiting for a mouse that feels as light as air, but doesn’t leave its innards exposed to every particle of dust on your desk, the Superlight is arguably the best gaming mouse you can buy. Read on for our full Logitech G Pro X Superlight review.

Logitech G Pro X Superlight review: Release date and price

The Logitech G Pro X Superlight is available now, and costs $150.

Logitech G Pro X Superlight review: Design

If you’ve played with the Logitech G Pro Wireless mouse (or the wired Logitech G Pro mouse), the Logitech G Pro X Superlight should be immediately recognizable. It’s a dead-simple design, with a nearly symmetrical black plastic chassis, a Logitech G logo in the center of the palm rest and barely anything else. There’s a slight indentation on either side, but no dedicated finger rests. For an ultralight mouse, it’s not that small — but it has no adornment, either.

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The Superlight, on the other hand, is just a plain old mouse, demonstrating that it’s entirely possible to make a tried-and-true mouse design even lighter than some of its garish competitors.

The big difference between the standard G Pro and the Superlight is the fact that the Superlight has no RGB lighting at all. While I generally like RGB lighting on mice, this is a smart omission, as the lights tend to add a little weight — and anyone buying an ultralight mouse is probably interested in functionality over aesthetics.

Otherwise, even though there are no textured grips by default, you can add your own, thanks to some stick-on grips included with the Superlight. While the textures aren’t as coarse or as pleasant as on something like the Logitech G502 Lightspeed, it’s at least good to have the option. (They’ll increase the weight by an infinitesimal amount, but when the mouse weighs only 2.2 ounces to begin with, that shouldn’t be a huge problem.)

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Interesting, what the Superlight is not may be more important than what it is. As mentioned above, most ultralight gaming mice employ a divisive honeycomb design (a Logitech press release refers to “ridiculous holes”), which some players find uncomfortable, and which almost certainly attracts a lot of dirt and dust over time. The Superlight, on the other hand, is just a plain old mouse, demonstrating that it’s entirely possible to make a tried-and-true mouse design even lighter than some of its garish competitors.

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

In terms of buttons, the Superlight has a left button, a right button, a clickable scroll wheel (with tasteful white highlights), two thumb buttons, and that’s it. On the bottom, there are two large, gray gliding feet, as well as a compartment where you can store the USB hub, or connect the Logitech PowerPlay adapter (more on this later). It’s a gorgeous, minimalist mouse, and it would look just as home in an office as it would in a gaming nook.

Logitech G Pro X Superlight review: Features

Like all other Logitech G mice, the Logitech G Pro X Superlight runs on the Logitech G Hub software. Since there’s no RGB lighting to adjust this time around, the software is just for adjusting dots-per-inch (DPI) sensitivity, reassigning buttons and creating profiles for individual games and apps. All of these features work fine, although having to create new profiles from the main G Hub screen rather than being able to do so right from the mouse menu is a slight pain.

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

You have two options for connecting the Superlight: a standard USB dongle or the Logitech PowerPlay system. The dongle uses a 2.4 GHz connection; the PowerPlay connection is a proprietary method that requires a $100 mouse pad that charges the Superlight’s battery as you play. While PowerPlay is still pretty expensive, it’s good to see Logitech supporting this functionality in all of its high-end wireless mice. Either way, the wireless connection is flawless.

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Without RGB lighting, the battery life is also impressive: Up to 70 hours on a charge. There are advantages to lightweight mice that go beyond how fast you can move them.

Logitech G Pro X Superlight review: Performance

The mouse felt light enough that I was able to lower my DPI, offering a more precise aiming and shooting experience as I zipped around a battlefield, mowing down demons along the way.

Once you get used to just how light the Logitech G Pro X Superlight feels, it works as well as any other high-end Logitech mouse. I tested the device with Doom Eternal, Age of Empires III: Definitive Edition, Shadow of the Tomb Raider and Final Fantasy XIV, and found that it felt accurate and responsive in every case.

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

I paid special attention to how it performed with Doom Eternal, as ultra-lightweight mice probably have more appeal for FPS players than fans of other genres. The mouse felt light enough that I was able to lower my DPI, offering a more precise aiming and shooting experience as I zipped around a battlefield, mowing down demons along the way.

In other genres, the Superlight worked well, but not any better than comparable mice. This one is probably better for the competitive crowd — or people who like to make big, sweeping gestures with their gaming mice.

Logitech G Pro X Superlight review: Verdict

Our Logitech G Pro X Superlight review highlights how the mouse makes good on its promise. Logitech wanted to marry an ultra-lightweight design with a premium feel and excellent performance, and succeeded on every count. Granted, the mouse is incredibly expensive, and almost identical to one of Logitech’s other mice. But if you believe that an extra ounce or so will make a huge difference in how you play, the Superlight gives you that option in style.

Logitech G Pro X Superlight review

(Image credit: Logitech)

If weight isn’t your primary concern, the Logitech G Pro Wireless mouse is a prettier gadget, and if weight is your primary concern, the HyperX Pulsefire Haste is slightly lighter. Otherwise, this is about the best balance of weight and features you can currently find from a trusted mouse manufacturer.

Marshall Honorof

Marshall Honorof is a senior editor for Tom's Guide, overseeing the site's coverage of gaming hardware and software. He comes from a science writing background, having studied paleomammalogy, biological anthropology, and the history of science and technology. After hours, you can find him practicing taekwondo or doing deep dives on classic sci-fi.