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Princeton Students Find Kindle "Disappointing"

Amazon announced the Kindle DX in May of this year and, at the time, Princeton University said it would be running a pilot program that would involve students using the device as a replacement for text books.

Unfortunately for Amazon, it seems that, despite eliminating back-breakingly heavy bookbags, students aren't exactly nuts about the devices. The Daily Princetonian reports that less than two weeks after 50 students received the free Kindle DX e-readers, many of them said they were dissatisfied and uncomfortable with the devices.

“I hate to sound like a Luddite, but this technology is a poor excuse of an academic tool,” said Aaron Horvath ’10, a student in Civil Society and Public Policy. “It’s clunky, slow and a real pain to operate.”

Another problem students and professors seem to be having is making annotations with the device. Horvath went on to say that he's had to adjust the way he digests information and completes his coursework because of the Kindle.

“Much of my learning comes from a physical interaction with the text: bookmarks, highlights, page-tearing, sticky notes and other marks representing the importance of certain passages — not to mention margin notes, where most of my paper ideas come from and interaction with the material occurs,” he explained to the Daily Princetonian. “All these things have been lost, and if not lost they’re too slow to keep up with my thinking, and the ‘features’ have been rendered useless.”

Are you a college-going student? How would you feel about replacing your text books with a Kindle DX? Let us know in the comments below.

Check out the full story here.

  • doomtomb
    Kindle is ready for prime-time yet.
    Reply
  • doomtomb
    isn't *
    Reply
  • ssddx
    An e-reader, and a paperless office while we are on the subject, will never replace a good old fashioned piece of paper or textbook. There is something to be said about physically having printed text in front of you to write on, study and ponder over.

    I would agree that such readers would be useful if you are traveling light or even when flying on a plane. However, I'd have to say no to using it as a complete replacement.
    Reply
  • lightsaber
    They are trying to make the kindle into the next ipod but instead of holding thousands of songs it will be holding books instead. Problem with the kindle is screen size needs to be more bigger and price needs to be more affordable.
    Reply
  • dark ice
    I agree, this would be a nice addition for when you can't lug around the normally rather large books that are given to you in college (or for any reading for that matter). However; I couldn't see this as being a complete replacement, just an addition to the books I physically own.
    Reply
  • IncinX
    I tried to take margin notes on a Kindle and the permanent marker hasn't come out yet =(
    Reply
  • IncinX
    Does anyone get sick of this bestofmedia/doubleblick crap slowing down page loading to a snails pace?
    Reply
  • pharge
    Tablet PC will be my first choice. I can do bookmark, highlight,take notes, draw figures.... even record the lecture with a tablet PC. However none of these are either easy to handle or possible on Kindles.

    The only few good things from Kindles are.... cheaper, lighter, and longer battery life... which are nice.... but... not enough to replace the textbooks.
    Reply
  • Will the electronic copy cost as much as the text book?
    Reply
  • I can see why. I prefer the Kindle 2 over the kindle DX for even just recreational usage. I got mine from here: http://www.computersncs.com/rd_p?p=191614&t=9544&a=27619-skindle&gift=27619
    Reply