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Tesla Motors Model S to Use Mercedes-Benz Parts

Tesla Motors makes cars that we want. Well, right now they make car that we want, but that that upcoming Model-S sure looks nice.

While Tesla must have some investors with very deep pockets bringing to market something like the Model-S is a monumental challenge for any car maker, let alone one that’s quite young.

Enter Daimler (best known for Mercedes-Benz), which today announced that it has taken a 10 percent stake in Tesla Motors.

Daimler and Tesla Motors aren’t complete strangers, as both recently collaborated in making the electric-powered Smart Car.

According to Reuters, Tesla will be allowed to rummage through Mercedes-Benz’s part bins for the final design and production of the Model-S electric sedan, which sounds like a good idea as it’ll give the new car tested parts and leave the company with more resources to develop the electric powertrain.

Hopefully this will mean that Mercedes-Benz cars will eventually get to tap into some of Tesla’s technology.

Read more about the Tesla Model-S sedan here, which is slated for a 2011 launch.

  • fulle
    People think, "yay, electric cars are clean and better for the environment"... but, most of the electricity we have comes from coal power plants, so not only does it defeat the purpose, but they probably are even worse for the environment.
    Reply
  • A Stoner
    I concure with fulle.
    Reply
  • squatchman
    Not to mention that the additional cost of the vehicle offsets the savings in fuel by a wide margin still.
    Reply
  • fuser
    Power from power plants -- even the ones powered by coal -- is much more efficient and clean than power from an ICE.

    The added benefit to an electric vehicle is that it becomes cleaner as the power grid becomes cleaner. A vehicle with an ICE only gets worse after it's purchased.
    Reply
  • eddieroolz
    fullePeople think, "yay, electric cars are clean and better for the environment"... but, most of the electricity we have comes from coal power plants, so not only does it defeat the purpose, but they probably are even worse for the environment.
    I guess electric cars would only make sense in countries which produce their electricity from green sources, such as Denmark, Canada, Norway and Sweden to name a few.

    I personally would see a market for Tesla in British Columbia, as our electricity is generated from hydro dams, hence the excessively low rates.
    Reply
  • fpoama
    I would rather take new electric vehicles today, so later down the road they can deal with the fact that electricity is still coming from coal power plants. Just think about powering your electric car and your home from solar panels on your roof.
    Reply
  • Taking into account 100% coal fire generated electricity, powerline powerloss of up to 500 miles, extra weight of batteries on board, electric cars still produce less co2 emissions. Although particle emissions from coal plants are often times worse for our health then co2, it does provide for global cooling. Its not in any sense a good trade off. If you factor in renewable energy, non toxic batteries with easy to find minerals like nizn(nickle zinc) then electricity becomes the best option for alternative fuels. Electric cars won't transport you from new york to LA, but planes/electric trains supported by local mass transit will do Just as good of a Job as a car and come ahead cleaner.
    Reply
  • IronRyan21
    fullePeople think, "yay, electric cars are clean and better for the environment"... but, most of the electricity we have comes from coal power plants, so not only does it defeat the purpose, but they probably are even worse for the environment.
    As long as we (Americans) feel better about ourselves, its ok. LOL
    Reply
  • jmchien
    If you do the math (Life Cycle Assessment), electricity from coal/gas is still cleaner than ICE (for EVs)
    Reply
  • zerapio
    fullePeople think, "yay, electric cars are clean and better for the environment"... but, most of the electricity we have comes from coal power plants, so not only does it defeat the purpose, but they probably are even worse for the environment.Did you know that power plants don't shut off at night when we use very little electricity? There was a study made which showed that this wasted power was enough to support a something like 70% conversion of all vehicles* to electric. What this means is that with NO additional burning of coal or infrastructure investment you could eliminate the emissions from ~70% of the vehicles. That's HUGE!!!
    Reply