School May Use RFID Chips to Track Students

Your school probably had some kind of system in place to keep track of students leaving class to go to the bathroom, or go on an errands for staff. Whether it was hall monitors, head boys and girls, or prefects, it's likely that your system involved human trackers. However, if the school board in Canaan, Connecticut, give a Westport security company the go ahead, hall passes could be a thing of the past. Instead, schools in the area would use RFID chips embedded in ID cards to keep track of students during school hours.

The RFID technology would also allow the school to monitor students movements in the event of a fire, as well as keep a close eye on visitors to the premises. There's also talk of possibly using the technology to track who is using which district school buses to make budgeting easier, as well as using the chips to track school equipment. Superintendent of Schools Dr. David Abbey said that students would participate in the program voluntarily and would also require parental consent.

The idea was broached by a security company called SecureRF Corporation. The company approached the schools as part of its research to investigate the uses of RF technology in commercial practices and schools. The NC advertiser cites Founder and Chief Executive Officer Louis Parks who says his company is looking to make a partner out of the school board.

"We are looking to test this technology with a partner," Parks told the school board on Monday. "The primary role we are looking for from [the school board] is the feedback and input."

Though the board is intrigued by the idea, officials say they won't sign off on anything until they hear more about the program and have all the information.

"The board hasn’t approved anything other than participating in discussions and exploration of a grant that may or may not have application to our school district but that has some exciting features that may work," Abbey said.

Board member Amy Rochlin echoed his thoughts on the project, expressing her interest but highlighting the need for more information on how it would work.

"From what I am hearing I am interested in exploring it more," she said, "…but as a board we need to know what they are signing off on."

Read the complete story on the NC Advertiser.

(via Read Write Web)

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  • blurr91
    What's preventing me from leaving my RFID hall pass in my locker while I run out for a beer?
    23
  • chickenhoagie
    oh this is most definitely not voluntary. what, people actually believe the kids will have a say in this? no waaay. They will enforce it, or they will be punished. Yet, kids are REQUIRED to go to school by all 50 states' laws. So what a great way for a school to get around the federal government and go against peoples' (including children) human rights. Jeesh..if children are going to be required to attend school, why can't school abide by guidelines and districts that follow the same in a typical workplace. Last i checked, i didn't have to get a pass signed or badge in at my job to use the restroom.

    But its fine, i'll just shit all over the floor in my classroom, and i'm not cleaning it up. that'll show'em.
    17
  • Travis Beane
    I nearly dropped out of school when they forced us to wear ID at all times. Some teachers didn't enforce it, even the principal. They all came around though with threats form the school board in my city.
    I chose public school over private school so I didn't have to wear the same uniform every day for 3 years.

    RFID?
    I'd go back to home schooling.
    10
  • Other Comments
  • Fetal
    I will sue them. sueee. (remembering when Cartman got abuse controller shit in his mind, vchip something, fkn hilarious)
    0
  • blurr91
    What's preventing me from leaving my RFID hall pass in my locker while I run out for a beer?
    23
  • zachary k
    i predict private school attendance will rise around schools that implement this. those who can't afford private schools will protest.
    3