Microsoft Surface Pro 10 — meet Microsoft’s first AI laptop

Microsoft Surface Pro 10
(Image credit: Microsoft)

The new Microsoft Surface Pro 10 is one of the latest “AI laptops” hitting the market and promises to be the most powerful Surface Pro machine yet. Microsoft announced the business model today (along with the Surface Laptop 6) but this machine gives us a glimpse of the consumer model arriving later this year.

The most notable thing about the Surface Pro 10 ($1,199 to start) is that packs an Intel Core Ultra processor. “Meteor Lake” chips feature a Neural Processing Unit (NPU) that facilitates AI-driven tasks, hence why Microsoft is labeling its new Surface devices as “AI PCs.” To that end, there’s a Surface Pro 10 model featuring a Windows Copilot key on the keyboard for easier access to Microsoft’s AI chatbot.

Microsoft Surface Pro 10: Specs

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Header Cell - Column 0 Microsoft Surface Pro 10 (for business)
Price$1,199 (starting)
OSWindows 11 Pro
Display13-inch (2,880 x 1,920) touch, 120Hz, 3:2 aspect ratio
CPUIntel Core Ultra 5 (135U) or Intel Core Ultra 7 (165U)
RAM8-64GB
Storage256GB - 1TB
Ports2x Thunderbolt 4/USB4, 1x Surface Connect, 1x Surface Keyboard
ConnectivityWi-Fi 6E, Bluetooth 5.3
ColorsPlatinum, Black
Dimensions1.3 x 8.2 x 0.37 inches
Weight1.94 pounds

Another new feature is an “AI-enhanced” 1440p ultrawide webcam (up from 1080p) that supports Windows Studio Effects. The effects in question include automatic framing, eye contact, and background blur. The camera has a 114-degree field of view, which Microsoft claims is the widest ever put into a Windows PC. There’s also a 10.5MP UHD rear-facing camera.

Design-wise, the Surface Pro 10 is identical to its predecessor. As before, the device measures 1.3 x 8.2 x 0.37 inches and weighs 1.94 pounds. It has an anodized aluminum body featuring a kickstand on the back and a magnetic attach for the keyboard. There’s a pair of Thunderbolt 4/USB4 ports, a Surface Connect port and a Surface Keyboard port.

This business model offers two color options: Platinum and Black. If the consumer version you’ll see in stores has the same colors as the Surface Pro 9, then expect Platinum, Graphite, Sapphire and Forest — with the latter three for Wi-Fi models (assuming there’s a 5G version like before).

Microsoft Surface Pro 10

(Image credit: Microsoft)

The Surface Pro 10 features a 13-inch touch display with a resolution of 2,880 x 1,920 pixels, a 3:2 aspect ratio and a 120Hz refresh rate. These are the same specs as the previous model, which means you’ll get a serviceable display that’s good enough for work and watching videos. Brightness, color saturation and color accuracy should also be on par with the Surface Pro 9, based on these specs.

Microsoft says the Surface Pro 10 is rated for 19 hours of battery life. If true, this device would last as long or longer than some of the best MacBooks. We’ll need to get the Surface Pro 10 into our testing lab to see if Microsoft’s battery life claims are true.

Outlook

The Microsoft Surface Pro 10 seems like a modest update. An enhanced webcam should make you look better during calls and the Meteor Lake chip could prove beneficial if AI features ever become more useful. Other than that, we’re largely getting the same device as before — which isn’t all that bad.

Like its predecessor, this device might end up in our best Windows laptops list. But we’ll see if that’s the case after we’ve gone hands-on with the Microsoft Surface Pro 10.

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Tony Polanco
Computing Writer

Tony is a computing writer at Tom’s Guide covering laptops, tablets, Windows, and iOS. During his off-hours, Tony enjoys reading comic books, playing video games, reading speculative fiction novels, and spending too much time on X/Twitter. His non-nerdy pursuits involve attending Hard Rock/Heavy Metal concerts and going to NYC bars with friends and colleagues. His work has appeared in publications such as Laptop Mag, PC Mag, and various independent gaming sites.