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Wiretape: Ultra-Thin Solution For Cable Clutter?

At E3 2010, Hitech Innovations recently demoed Wiretape, a new product that promises to cut down on cable clutter. The company hopes the market its offering to home entertainment and PC enthusiasts who have long suffered from messy wires.

The Wiretape system simply flattens wired connections into a much more manageable tape that's 0.16 mm thick. It accommodates popular transmission formats like USB, HDMI, Ethernet, and other standards commonplace in home theater and computer setups.

Buyers will simply measure out the length they need, cut it out like tape, and connect both ends into so-called connection boxes. Once the connections are made the tape can be secured directly to the walls, floors, and even underneath furniture for minimum visual disruption. The tape is flexible enough to fold multiple times, which means it takes corners easily.

Wiretape comes in five- and the wider eighteen-line versions. These flattened lines are visible through the transparent insulation. Different-colored lines will be available to consumers when the product debuts later this year, to make blending in with the surroundings easier. The key selling point of Wiretape however is that users can paint over the tape if they desire the ultimate camouflage.

Hitech is planning to make Wiretape available to the general market by September 2010. No price info was available as of this writing.

At E3: Wiretape, a super-thin cable you can paint

  • mavroxur
    Being flat with no twisted pairs for impedance and no real EMI canceling characteristics, I kinda have doubts about it's performance. I know flat ribbon cables are used all the time inside electronics for short distances, but running from a TV to a receiver carrying 1080p might be interesting to see how well it performs. They twist pairs and shield cables for a reason.
    Reply
  • ssddx
    Mavroxur that is absolutely true. Also of note is that speakerwire with the same clear covering & bare flat wires has been available for years now. It seems that this company is just trying to copy that concept and make money when it comes to hdmi & other cords.
    Reply
  • eyemaster
    Nice that something like this is finally available. Maybe there will be a version with shielding.
    Reply
  • will_chellam
    The only time I can see this making any difference is in home cinema setups where you have to run long runs of cable up walls, around room or under carpets, as mentioned, it looks like this is where you might encounter most problems like signal loss or accidental damage.

    Personally I would go the whole-hog and bury proper cables in wall channels, or at the very least just hide them in those plastic screw/stick-on cable channels.
    Reply
  • OMG ribbon wire is totally revolutionary, new, different, unique, and modern!

    They should name it iRibbon and charge $100 a foot.
    Reply
  • nukemaster
    I remember seeing this before for running power(low voltage) and I think speaker cables.
    Reply
  • jaysbob
    great now I can have a tangled up flat wire instead of a round one.
    Reply
  • uh_no
    um....i thought the idea was to move AWAY from flat cables.....
    Reply
  • littlec
    mavroxurBeing flat with no twisted pairs for impedance and no real EMI canceling characteristics, I kinda have doubts about it's performance. I know flat ribbon cables are used all the time inside electronics for short distances, but running from a TV to a receiver carrying 1080p might be interesting to see how well it performs. They twist pairs and shield cables for a reason.Yup that's the first thing they teach you when you work with cables.
    Reply
  • will_chellam
    back_by_demandIf I have a wall mounted TV and a Blurau player below, I dont want trunking or a cable running up to it.For the sake of 2m of Wiretape that I can paint or wallpaper over I think it will be just fine.
    Yep, you can put your nicely painted wiretape right next to the power cord....
    Reply