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Tunnel Linking New York And London Unveiled

One end of the Telectroscope protrudes from the ground near the Tower Bridge on the banks of the River Thames in London, while the other end is located near Fulton Ferry Landing in NYC. The official story (from artist and inventor, Paul St George) is that there’s a long tunnel running through the earth’s crust and the simplicity of mirrors bounces the reflection of the one city back to the other, similar to a periscope.

St George claims his great-grandad began building the tunnels with plans to make the Telectroscope himself but never finished it. Stick with us, we’re deadly serious, we’re just not sure we can say the same for him . . .

The inventor apparently discovered his grandfather’s plans, finished the tunnels and installed parabolic mirrors at either end. When timeout.com expressed their curiosity about the tunnels, St George said,

“I didn’t build it—I connected existing tunnels. I was able to access lines in the middle of the Atlantic left over from when people laid the first telegraph cables—the “Victorian Internet.” I used mirrors to enlarge the images and bring them up from underground, like a periscope.”

So that’s the “official” story for now, but what would life be without the unofficial story (read speculation)? What’s everyone else saying? While it seems people agree on how impressive the Telectroscope is, they’re not exactly buying St George’s story hook, line and sinker with most gravitating toward the optical fibre/webcam route.

We’re a little dubious of the story ourselves but we’ll wait to see how this one pans out. We also kind of want to see who’s showing whom what after a few too many beers at 2am on Friday night.

The Telectroscope is on display from the 22nd of May (unveiled at 10am) until the 15th of June.

  • gm0n3y
    I'm pretty sure this will just end up being a webcam on either side and a small LCD screen, though you should be able to tell since the image wouldn't be pixelated at all if he's telling the truth.
    Reply
  • sacre
    Grab binocs, and use em up against the glass... look carefully at the image and check for pixels.

    If they're are no pixels, then its not a screen.

    Honestly though, i think its just optic fibre..
    Reply
  • the full story can be found at http://timwright.typepad.com/telectroscope

    cheers

    timw
    Reply
  • virtualban
    When I read the title of the article I thought about what I have only seen in Discovery's Extreme Engineering, the physical tunnel that will allow travel of people in less than one hour between these 2 cities. Now that would be really impressive, and starting to build it would be a great news. Or even investment of some money in more than simply a theoretical project... I know even if they start building it now I probably won't be alive to see it come to realization, Terminator3 made it clear.
    Reply
  • gm0n3y
    @virtualban

    Are you saying that Skynet is going to come online first?
    Reply
  • virtualban
    Maybe not skynet, but surely, in the 100 years (prediction by discovery channel) needed to build the transatlantic tunnel, who knows what will come. One thing is for sure: that emulated 4 year old intelligence in second life is going to grow up. And maybe not for software reasons, but at least because of hardware, AI will evolve, and will be given more control over time. And while some will be afraid to give that control to machines, 6 billion people can't be predicted never to. And with all that software that requires to be online, at least once in a while, close to all computers will go online and that means a lot of cyberspace to take a walk to. It might be just a tiny process running in one of the cores of the cpu or gpu, until a way to get more control over the physical word is found :)
    Now, I wish I'd live long enough to see that. And this probably I will, but would be too old to do something about it, except unplug my portion of cyberspace. :P
    Reply