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Hackers Steal Data From T-Mobile, Trying to Sell

Over the weekend, a message from the attackers was made public on the full disclosure mailing list. Claiming to have “everything” (from confidential documents and financial documents to scripts and programs from their servers) the hackers said they had already contacted competitors of T-Mobile, offering to sell the data but because they had received no response, they were ready to sell to the highest bidder.

According to eWeek, a spokesperson from T-Mobile said the company is unable to disclose additional information at this time, but stated customers “can be assured if there is any evidence that customer information has been compromised, we would inform those affected as quickly as possible."

Full transcript of the email is below (or click here to go directly to Full Disclosure):

Hello world,The U.S. T-Mobile network predominately uses the GSM/GPRS/EDGE 1900 MHz frequency-band, making it the largest 1900 MHz network in the United States. Service isavailable in 98 of the 100 largest markets and 268 million potential customers.Like Checkpoint Tmobile has been owned for some time. We have everything, their databases, confidental documents, scripts and programs from their servers,financial documents up to 2009.We already contacted with their competitors and they didn't show interest in buying their data -probably because the mails got to the wrong people- so now we areoffering them for the highest bidder.Please only serious offers, don't waste our time.Contact: pwnmobile_at_safe-mail.net

[UPDATE] T-Mobile has said the data posted on Full Disclosure was not obtained by hacking into the company's system. According to PCWorld, T-Mobile said in a statement that the hackers did have legitimate T-Mobile data, but they didn't do it by hacking into the company's network. The statement went on to detail that there was no customer information contained in the document, nor does the T-Mobile security system show any evidence of a breach. A company spokes person refused to say how hackers got a hold of the information. Very fish indeed.

  • Onus
    Find these people, perhaps by seeking to do business with them, then use them ALL for training in wet-work.
    Reply
  • Hanin33
    these kinds of things makes me wonder why laws aren't enacted to punish these incompetent service providers and their lack of will or just plain ineptitude. these kind of security breaches should not be occurring. it is true that it is impossible to completely keep a system secure but they should be able to minimize the depth and time these 'hackers' have to run wild in their systems. i find it hard to believe that they do not have teams specifically assigned to monitor and track intrusions in their systems.
    Reply
  • Hatecrime69
    Yeah, like any of t-mobile's competitors would even consider such an act, if any of them did they would be in a serious world of legal hurt, like a giant 'sue me' sign on their foreheads
    Reply
  • chripuck
    Hanin33these kinds of things makes me wonder why laws aren't enacted to punish these incompetent service providers and their lack of will or just plain ineptitude. these kind of security breaches should not be occurring. it is true that it is impossible to completely keep a system secure but they should be able to minimize the depth and time these 'hackers' have to run wild in their systems. i find it hard to believe that they do not have teams specifically assigned to monitor and track intrusions in their systems.
    Did you not read the part where T-Mobile said there was no security breach? Reading comprehension FTW...
    Reply
  • Hanin33
    chripuckDid you not read the part where T-Mobile said there was no security breach? Reading comprehension FTW...
    that was posted after i commented, hater. and i wouldn't trust wot they're saying after the fact. they can make their reports say wotever they wish them to say. if it can be proven the data is authentic then t-mobile's excuses mean very little. next!
    Reply
  • duzcizgi
    chripuckDid you not read the part where T-Mobile said there was no security breach? Reading comprehension FTW...If you are competent enough to get in, through the firewall, and were able to copy the databases etc. over, then you should be competent enough to clear up your traces as well. Even in the dawn of computer networks & hacking, hackers were clearing their traces as soon as they're finished with what they are doing. So, "security isn't breached" means just "we don't have any logs stating that someone entered our network".
    So, not having logs, does it really mean that nobody entered, or, someone entered and then cleared up all the logs regarding her when she's finished?
    Reply
  • Parrdacc
    I don't know. Something just feels wrong here. This is about the fourth story I have read or heard about in the last 6 months that follows the same pattern. Hackers steal confidential, either/or customer and company, information then publicly claim they have it and try and get money for it. Not saying it is not possible and not saying it isn't even true; just seems a lot of this going around to make me think that the maybe it is not all hackers. Perhaps it is some sort of new Nigeria scam. Just a thought.
    Reply
  • danimal_the_animal
    ParrdaccI don't know. Something just feels wrong here. This is about the fourth story I have read or heard about in the last 6 months that follows the same pattern. Hackers steal confidential, either/or customer and company, information then publicly claim they have it and try and get money for it. Not saying it is not possible and not saying it isn't even true; just seems a lot of this going around to make me think that the maybe it is not all hackers. Perhaps it is some sort of new Nigeria scam. Just a thought.
    Exactly....What if the T-mobile Administrators SUCK AT THEIR JOB!!!!

    they can tell their bosses..."Nah...nobody hacked us" just so that they can keep their jobs....heck...what if they were too stupid to know what happened.....or are not competent enough to see an attack that is right in front of their face.

    You would have to BE a hacker in order to spot a hack.....no experience in this field= unable to detect problem.....It's like going into a pitch black closet trying to find something....Not going to happen.....


    So their is a 50/50 chance that the T-mobile network admins either know what to look for or not
    Reply
  • scook9
    Guess I DON'T need a mobile makeover after all, even from Catherine Zeta-Jones.
    Reply
  • Kill@dor
    I don't understand how they got this info without hacking. Its either an inside job, or the hackers did hack un-noticed in the network (i.e. they obtained usernames and passwords somehow).
    Reply