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Internet Explorer dies today — what you need to know

Internet Explorer logo on phone
(Image credit: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Microsoft (opens in new tab) officially ends support for Internet Explorer June 15, 2022 at midnight. This marks the end of an era for the Redmond-based company, but it also has very real implications for those still using the 27-year-old web browser.

IE Explorer is dead: what this means for users 

At this point, many users have likely shifted away from Internet Explorer. The news that Internet Explorer would be retiring on June 15, 2022, was reported over a year ago. For many people that signaled that it was time to move on.

But for those who were not ready to leave, or simply did not want to stop using the familiar browser, starting at midnight they will not have a choice. At that point, any attempt to open the Internet Explorer desktop app will automatically redirect you (opens in new tab) to Microsoft Edge. 

Can anyone still use Internet Explorer after June 15?

Microsoft has stated that “This retirement does not affect in-market Windows 10 LTSC or Server Internet Explorer 11 desktop applications.” This largely applies to enterprise users of the software only, and most consumers will be unable to use the application. However, Microsoft Edge will continue to offer an in-browser legacy mode for websites that still require Internet Explorer. 

What users need to do before Internet Explorer retires 

The main thing users need to worry about is the bookmarks. The desktop application is being disabled, so users will not have access to any browser data going forward. 

Microsoft Edge offers the easiest solution for this problem. All users have to do is enter the Microsoft Edge Settings menu, click on the Profiles section, and select “Import browser data.” Then it is as simple as selecting “Microsoft Internet Explorer” and clicking “Import.”

If you do not want to use Microsoft Edge, many other browsers also offer the ability to import bookmarks.

Internet Explorer alternatives 

Microsoft Edge 

Microsoft Edge Browser

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

The successor to Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge has been the default browser for Windows since the debut of Windows 10.  Because of that, it is also the most optimized for use with Windows OS. This contributes to small, but nice advantages over other browsers, such as improved Xbox Cloud Gaming performance. Plus, Edge is more memory-efficient than the competition. 

Chrome

The Google Chrome logo displayed on a laptop screen.

(Image credit: monticello/Shutterstock)

Chrome is incredibly popular. In fact, it is the most popular web browser on Earth. Google’s web browser is quick, is available on numerous platforms and is very easy to install. Plus, if you use a Chromebook or Android phone the ability to have a unified experience across devices may make this your preferred choice to Microsoft Edge as a web browser. 

Firefox 

Firefox web browser logo

(Image credit: dennizn / Shutterstock.com)

Firefox is the one browser here that is not Chromium-based, though for most users that fact will not impact their user experience one way or the other. What will make an impact though is the recent refresh that Firefox underwent in 2021. This update improved tabs functionality, media autoplay and privacy protections. 

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Malcolm McMillan
News Writer

Malcolm McMillan is a News Writer for Tom's Guide. Before writing for Tom's Guide, he worked many retail jobs and many Black Fridays, including a stint for Microsoft. He is passionate about video games and sports, though both cause him to yell at the TV frequently. In his spare time, Malcolm is a fantasy football analyst. He proudly sports many tattoos, including an Arsenal tattoo, in honor of the team that causes him to yell at the TV the most.