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Barnes & Noble Honeycomb E-Reader this Month?

Wednesday book retailer Barnes & Noble told analysts and investors that it's slated to reveal a new e-reader later on this month. The announcement arrives just over a week after the company released an update to the 7-inch Nook Color's Android operating system that adds an app store, Adobe Flash support and more, seemingly transforming the e-book reader into a low-cost Android tablet.

In a Securities and Exchange Commission filing released after the close of trading Wednesday, Barnes & Noble "indicated [in a meeting that] it expects to make an announcement on May 24, 2011, regarding the launch of a new eReader device." The statement was made in compliance with Regulation FD fair disclosure rules, and didn't provide any additional details about the hardware or software.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Barnes & Noble spokeswoman Mary Ellen Keating declined to comment beyond the 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, but confirmed that the meeting took place in New York City. Analysts attending the meeting didn't return any phone calls.

Given the direction that Barnes & Noble has taken with the Nook Color "tablet," the retail chain is expected to reveal a tablet-like device sporting Google's Android 3.0 "Honeycomb" operating system later this month. The new features that were recently added to the Nook Color platform-- including a fully-featured email client, Flash support and app store, are also expected to arrive on the new device.

Barnes & Noble's original Nook e-reader currently sells for $149 and features a 6-inch eInk (monochrome) screen and 2 GB of storage. The Nook Color is considerably more expensive at $249, but offers a 7-inch color touchscreen, 8 GB of storage, can access the Internet, and currently runs on Google's Android 2.2 "Froyo" OS. Thanks to the addition of the Nook Apps, owners of the latter device can now play Angry Birds, Uno, Dead Space and more.

Microsoft sued Barnes & Noble last month, accusing the book chain of patent infringement related to the Nook device. The Redmond-based company holds patents to technology used on the Android platform, mainly those relating to navigation and how Web sites present content. Microsoft tried to negotiate a licensing agreement with Barnes & Noble, but did not have any success.

  • molo9000
    LCD e-reader: Very bad idea.

    Even the iPad's IPS LCD display is not the kind of thing you'd want to read a whole book on. It's probably not that bad but e-paper is much much MUCH better.
    Reply
  • distracteddaddy
    Sorry, I disagree. I love my NC and I use it primarily as an eReader. I read in bed with my Wife asleep, so a back light is a requirement. Try and get that with E-ink. Oh, NC is IPS as well. Did I mention it's a color display? Sorry, E-ink, e-paper or any similar tech, until you are at least back lit you don't make my list.
    Reply
  • captaincharisma
    i was once in a Barnes & Noble i a got kicked out because i was putting all the bibles in the "fiction" section
    Reply
  • bardia
    These LCD screens are just horrible for reading. As an attorney, I have to read print text on an LCD all day, and to be honest, some days I'd rather be water-boarded. Distracteddaddy's complete misunderstanding of technology aside, reflective screens are the only way to go when it comes to text.

    I have a Nook 3G, which was a pretty good E-reader, far surpassing the Nook Color. But with the recent direction B&N has taken, I'm thinking of switching over to Amazon. At least they won't be abandoning the Kindle line like B&N has the Nook line. I'm pretty frustrated with B&N right now.
    Reply
  • aaron88_7
    I only want a Nook Color to root it with Honeycomb, so as long as the price doesn't go above $250 I'll consider one.

    Any more expensive and I'd rather wait for more 10 inch tablets to be released.
    Reply
  • virtualban
    captaincharismai was once in a Barnes & Noble i a got kicked out because i was putting all the bibles in the "fiction" sectionHahaha!!
    Reply
  • Chrys
    Where is my textbook size color e-ink reader?!?!!?
    Reply
  • txsouthpaw
    captaincharismai was once in a Barnes & Noble i a got kicked out because i was putting all the bibles in the "fiction" section
    LOL
    Reply
  • knownballer
    bardiaThese LCD screens are just horrible for reading. As an attorney, I have to read print text on an LCD all day, and to be honest, some days I'd rather be water-boarded. Distracteddaddy's complete misunderstanding of technology aside, reflective screens are the only way to go when it comes to text. I have a Nook 3G, which was a pretty good E-reader, far surpassing the Nook Color. But with the recent direction B&N has taken, I'm thinking of switching over to Amazon. At least they won't be abandoning the Kindle line like B&N has the Nook line. I'm pretty frustrated with B&N right now.
    I honestly would go that extreme as buying into kindle puts you in a closed system. I have an iPad and a regular nook. I also bough a nook color for my mom for Christmas. While I like my nook, the problem is that it's really not useful for reading earnings reports, which was a very big reason why I got one. The size isn't big enough, and when deciding on a bigger ereader, a tablet just makes more sense. The iPad, while being very overpriced, is great at a lot of reading I do, including online reading. After tuning down the brightness I found it to be very manageable though I wish the brightness could go a bit lower for night.

    They both have their benefits, but I think B&N is till trying to find where they compete in this digital world. Having a tablet may be the answer. If your really interested in a bigger tablet I suggest the ASIs epad as it comes built to be used as a notebook and tablet. Its received very good reviews.
    Reply
  • KT_WASP
    Sorry... But, if I wanted a tablet PC, then I would buy a tablet PC. I do not like the route B&N (and Amazon, according to rumors) are going with these new "E-Readers". E-Readers are supposed to mimic the experience you get when reading a book, not the experience you get from a using a PC (emails, internet surfing, games.. yadda yadda yadda).

    Amazon Kindle is tops for a reason.. reasonably priced, book-like e-ink, light weight and long battery life. Basic, Simple and does what it supposed to do. Now you get these "E-readers" coming out (B&N NC) that are big, bulky, cost more money, do a bunch of things other then reading (the whole point of it) and have battery life of about 8 hours (if you are lucky). Even the Nook got to "cute" with the color touch screen... all that did was cut battery life down drastically for no other reason then to be trendy with touch and to say they had color added.

    Sorry.... but these things are not for me. So, note to Amazon.... if you want to try your hand in the tablet PC market, then by all means, go for it. BUT, do not mess with the winning formula that is Kindle. Name your tablets something else and keep the Kindles as true E-Readers, do that and I think you will see people continue to choose you over B&N.
    Reply