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Cities Campaigning to Get Google Fiber Net Access

By - Source: Tom's Guide US | B 29 comments

Cities across the nation are trying to get a daily dose of Google Fiber.

There wasn't any big media celebration when Wilmington, North Carolina was chosen to test the now-present digital TV transmission a whole year before it went nationwide. The city is now testing the market for White Space left over by the digital transition, providing free, public Internet access to anyone in a specific area.

But what's really making news is how cities across the nation are rallying to get first dibs on Google's intent to build an Internet Service Provider, aka Google Fiber. "Google is planning to build, and test ultra-high speed broadband networks in a small number of trial locations across the country," the company says here in its project overview.

"We'll deliver Internet speeds more than 100 times faster than what most Americans have access to today with 1 gigabit per second, fiber-to-the-home connections," the company added. "We'll offer service at a competitive price to at least 50,000, and potentially up to 500,000 people. "

So began a media frenzy. Cities of all sizes nationwide have spared no expense to capture Google's attention, and Zettaphile has captured some of the magic on its website, highlighting efforts by Columbia, Missouri, Memphis, Tennessee, Greensboro, North Carolina, Peoria, Illinois, and so many others.

As an example, Sarasota, Florida has apparently renamed its City Island to Google Island. Duluth, Minnesota mayor Don Ness tries to get the Internet search giant's attention by creating a spoof video where he declared all first-born boys to be named "GoogleFiber," and all first-born females to be named "Googlette." The mayor of Topeka, Kansas said that the city would be renamed to Google, Kansas for the entire month of March.

Meanwhile, the residents of Wilmington, North Carolina are basking in free, public Internet. It may not be 1GB/s, but it costs nothing to surf the Internet at the park. Now that's fiber you can really chew on.

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Top Comments
  • 13 Hide
    ayssius , March 11, 2010 11:04 PM
    1 Gigabit is only 119.2 MB/s theoretically. Most standard hard drives come close at least for bursts, and all SSD's are easily capable of acheiving this. However most of the downloads would be directly to Ram, such as simply loading web pages very rapidly. And most broadband connections never actually hit 100% of there theoretical saturation anyhow. Especially since you would need servers capable of handling multiple 1GB upstreams, so realistically even if you got a solid 50MB/s transfer, that wouldn't be something to complain about. I for one am glad to see the ageing network infastructure finally being updated.
  • 11 Hide
    montyp2000 , March 11, 2010 11:31 PM
    I hope my town of Schererville, IN gets it. My doctor keeps saying I need more fiber. ;-)
Other Comments
  • 7 Hide
    Dandalf , March 11, 2010 10:39 PM
    MY HARD DRIVE CANNOT WRITE DATA AT THAT SPEED
  • Display all 29 comments.
  • 8 Hide
    Shadow703793 , March 11, 2010 10:47 PM
    DandalfMY HARD DRIVE CANNOT WRITE DATA AT THAT SPEED

    lol, SSD time
    /sarcasm due to the ~$2+ per GB for SSDs.
  • 8 Hide
    jacobdrj , March 11, 2010 10:52 PM
    I wish my city would do this... I should totally write my city council.
  • -1 Hide
    LsRamAir , March 11, 2010 10:52 PM
    well get a new hard drive, my laptop drive writes at that speed.
  • 0 Hide
    RySean , March 11, 2010 10:54 PM
    I wish San Diego would campaign... We badly need it here...
  • 8 Hide
    tacoslave , March 11, 2010 10:54 PM
    hd p0rn just got a new subscriber if google comes to my town that is
  • 6 Hide
    bipolargraph , March 11, 2010 10:59 PM
    Maybe they should join the church of google. :p 
  • 13 Hide
    ayssius , March 11, 2010 11:04 PM
    1 Gigabit is only 119.2 MB/s theoretically. Most standard hard drives come close at least for bursts, and all SSD's are easily capable of acheiving this. However most of the downloads would be directly to Ram, such as simply loading web pages very rapidly. And most broadband connections never actually hit 100% of there theoretical saturation anyhow. Especially since you would need servers capable of handling multiple 1GB upstreams, so realistically even if you got a solid 50MB/s transfer, that wouldn't be something to complain about. I for one am glad to see the ageing network infastructure finally being updated.
  • 11 Hide
    montyp2000 , March 11, 2010 11:31 PM
    I hope my town of Schererville, IN gets it. My doctor keeps saying I need more fiber. ;-)
  • 3 Hide
    toastninja17 , March 11, 2010 11:43 PM
    See, now this is cool and all, but in order to really enjoy the fruits of what Google is offering, you've gotta be able to actually handle those kinds of speeds. Yes, cities may be campaigning to have access to the 1gb/s speeds, but people at home will need the actual hardware capable of receiving such speeds. But props to those who have the means of taking advantage of this!
  • 1 Hide
    doc70 , March 11, 2010 11:56 PM
    "Cities campaigning to get a free slice of the Google pie"...

    There, I fixed the title for ya...
  • -4 Hide
    bison88 , March 12, 2010 12:11 AM
    First of all you have to ask yourself where are you going to find a place to download at the max of 1Gbps anyways. I am positive very few sites could actually achieve this for one user and not drag the rest of their servers down the hole. Unless of course you are torrenting a dozen huge torrents where each one is hosting on a 100Mbps line I doubt you will see the max of that speed anytime soon. As most have already speculated, it's more of a publicity statement than anything really useful.
  • 0 Hide
    shadowryche , March 12, 2010 12:26 AM
    Grand Rapids, MI is on that campaign. I guess next week local business's are holding a rally in down town to get Google's attention. Our worthless state governor is in California kissing google's ass to get them to come here.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , March 12, 2010 12:31 AM
    there was a time when people said half a megabit connection was excessive then youtube came along, give it time and im sure someone would find an application for a gigabit connection, im thinking hulu in HD 1080 style....
  • 0 Hide
    p3t3or , March 12, 2010 12:40 AM
    I
  • 0 Hide
    rpmrush , March 12, 2010 1:26 AM
    Thank you Greensboro! Bring it!
  • 0 Hide
    Supertrek32 , March 12, 2010 3:19 AM
    bison88First of all you have to ask yourself where are you going to find a place to download at the max of 1Gbps anyways. I am positive very few sites could actually achieve this for one user and not drag the rest of their servers down the hole. Unless of course you are torrenting a dozen huge torrents where each one is hosting on a 100Mbps line I doubt you will see the max of that speed anytime soon. As most have already speculated, it's more of a publicity statement than anything really useful.

    A needed publicity statement if you ask me. Most non-technical people don't realize that ISPs are ripping them off big-time.
  • 0 Hide
    m-manla , March 12, 2010 3:26 AM
    DandalfMY HARD DRIVE CANNOT WRITE DATA AT THAT SPEED


    SSDs can! One Gigabit = 128 Megabytes.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , March 12, 2010 4:02 AM
    curse you google for not dominating all life on earth already. it's google's fault that we're not able to play games lag free! /sarcasm
  • 0 Hide
    Wolygon , March 12, 2010 5:18 AM
    "It may not be 1GB/s"

    I believe that is supposed to be 1Gb/s, as 1GB/s is 1 Gigabyte per second.
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