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Google Close to Launching Cloud Storage Service

By - Source: Wall Street Journal | B 13 comments

Google plans to rival Dropbox and Box.net with its own free and paid virtual storage solution.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Google is gearing up to launch a cloud storage service similar to Dropbox and Box.net. It will be called Google Drive (or simply Drive), and offer both free and paid space for consumers who want to store files online for retrieving on the go with multiple web-connected mobile devices. Compatible file types will include videos, photos and documents.

Insiders close to Google Drive said that users will have the ability to shoot video from their smartphone and upload the file to their virtual locker through Google's Drive mobile app. They will then be able to email friends and family a link back to the video, eliminating the need to send a bulky file. What's unknown at this point is the capacities in which Google will offer, but will likely provide 2 to 5 GB for free to consumers and businesses. Insiders state that Google will charge a fee for those who want to store large amounts of files for a cheaper price than what Dropbox currently requires.

By comparison, Dropbox offers 2 GB of free online storage. However for 50 GB, customers are required to pay $9.99 USD per month. 100 GB of virtual storage costs $19.99 USD per month, and Dropbox even offers larger storage capacities with plans starting at $795 for 5 users. But unlike Google, Dropbox relies on Amazon's Web Services which maintains a network of computers for storing data online. Amazon leases out this space to the likes of Dropbox, Netflix and even Zynga.

Google already offers online storage for free via Google Music and Google Docs. Consumers can store up to 20,000 songs in their virtual music locker. Songs purchased through Android Market can be shared on Google+ -- those uploaded or received for free via Google do not have a sharing option. On Google Docs, users can create documents, store them indefinitely, and either share them via an email link, or email them directly as an actual file.

Additionally, Google customers can shoot photos with their smartphone and upload them to Google+ and Picasa -- sharing simply means sending a link to friends and family. Videos can be uploaded and shared using YouTube with options of going public or remaining private. That said, Google Drive may actually combine at least three of the search engine giant's services on a storage level -- or simply provide a standalone virtual locker for consumers who don't typically use Google+, Google Docs and YouTube.

Sources told the Wall Street Journal that Google Drive is expected to be added to the search engine giant's Google Apps software that's sold to businesses. The service, for both consumers and businesses, should launch within the next couple of weeks or months.

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  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , February 9, 2012 10:19 PM
    As long as the servers are located in Mongolia we shouldn't worry about a server seizure ...
  • 4 Hide
    dietcreamsoda , February 9, 2012 11:11 PM
    With Microsoft offering 25BG free with their skydrive service, I'd be surprised if Google only offers 2-5GB.
  • 1 Hide
    dietcreamsoda , February 9, 2012 11:11 PM
    oops...25GB
  • Display all 13 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    zodiacfml , February 10, 2012 1:08 AM
    Can't wait. I've been using Google's storage for Picasa and Google Docs and is inconvenient to use for other files. I hope they could slash prices or increase storage. I can't seem to have enough of it.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , February 10, 2012 1:47 AM
    why would google offer 2-5GB on a cloud storage service when gmail gives you >7GB and it is free?
  • 0 Hide
    ThisIsMe , February 10, 2012 2:03 AM
    They're only doing it so now they can even have access to what used to be stored locally by people and beyond their reach.

    Okay, okay I'm only joking ...but what if I'm not? lol
  • 2 Hide
    jhansonxi , February 10, 2012 2:37 AM
    ThisIsMeThey're only doing it so now they can even have access to what used to be stored locally by people and beyond their reach.Okay, okay I'm only joking ...but what if I'm not? lol
    Unless the service requires a proprietary client to use it then that won't happen. If you are worried about privacy then use encryption.
  • 0 Hide
    jbo5112 , February 10, 2012 11:14 AM
    Google is going to release a service where you can upload a video, then send people a link to it??! HOLY YOUTUBE BATMAN!!
  • -1 Hide
    wopr11 , February 10, 2012 11:55 AM
    And if you ever bother to read Google's User Agreement you will notice that anything you upload becomes Google's Property and they can do with it anything they want - and there's nothing you can do about it.
  • 0 Hide
    hoofhearted , February 10, 2012 1:15 PM
    Why are they still pushing this cloud BS?

    SOPA .... PIPA .... Megaupload .... FBI ....

    Like I am going to trust my backups to this "cloud" house of cards.
  • 1 Hide
    hardcore_gamer , February 10, 2012 1:31 PM
    I don't trust them with my personal data. Same goes for FB.
  • 1 Hide
    newbie_mcnoob , February 10, 2012 2:21 PM
    "Store all your data in the cloud. It's safe with us."

    Just ask MegaUpload...
  • 0 Hide
    gm0n3y , February 10, 2012 4:48 PM
    They are marketing cloud storage as a way to share data with other people, so there is no reason to worry about it being taken offline as its not designed to be used as primary or even backup storage. If they limit the file types to media and office-type documents then they aren't really offering anything new since you can already do that with their other services. Still, it would be nice to have a central location to manage all of your online files. I'll give it a try, I just won't upload anything incriminating.
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