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File Sharing After Megaupload: 8 Alternatives

RapidShare

RapidShare is one of the oldest file sharing services still in existence—it began a solid three years before Megaupload. You might even go as far as to say that RapidShare was the first to come up with the shady business model that Megaupload perfected. Prior to the shutdown, Megaupload was bringing in $175 million in net income, which is pretty impressive considering it only had about 150 employees.

The way RapidShare works is certainly the worst thing about it. You want to download a file? You must first wait six minutes. You want to download another file? Now you have to wait 167 minutes. Once you’re done waiting for the download to start, it’s time to wait some more since you’ll be limited to about 200KB/s, maximum. If you don’t want to play the waiting game, you can always purchase a RapidShare subscription which gives you an allotted number of “rapid” downloads per month, starting at about $13. RapidShare really does go out of its way to make sure using a free account is absolutely intolerable.

On the plus side, you don’t have to battle with third-party ads or pop-ups. All of the page space is already taken up by RapidShare’s own subscription ads anyway. Also, since RapidShare requires its users to register (either with a free or paid account) in order to upload files, piracy is much less of an issue, though that doesn’t mean RapidShare hasn’t had its share of trouble.

RapidShare has been pulled into court on several occasions over copyright infringements, and despite a few preliminary injections that were later overturned by the higher courts, it has yet to lose big. Being headquartered in Switzerland, the Mecca for pirate and pirate-like sites, certainly helps, and thanks to the registration requirement for uploaders, judges consistently rule that RapidShare is not liable for its users’ copyright infringements.

Perhaps even more surprising is RapidShare’s strong political stance advocating internet privacy.

  • azathoth
    I love mediafire especially with ad-block enabled, just goes straight to the click to download, no popups or ads.
    Reply
  • "Besides, illegal file sharing is the only reason anonymity is such a big deal."

    Well, of course. There's absolutely no other reason for anonymity.

    Wait, whistleblowers? What are those?
    Reply
  • quantumrand
    Paul Granis"Besides, illegal file sharing is the only reason anonymity is such a big deal."Well, of course. There's absolutely no other reason for anonymity.Wait, whistleblowers? What are those?
    Whistleblowers don't have much need for anonymous filesharing services. Whistle blowing generally involves an anonymous phone call or e-mail. Very rarely does it involve the need to share large files. And even if it did, it's not hard to sign up for something like DropBox with a fake name and dummy e-mail address at some internet cafe and upload your files there.
    Reply
  • Although the author is correct on Megaupload using pop-up ads, I disagree on the "misleading download buttons". How is 2 big buttons, one for premium, one for non-premium after 25-45 second wait misleading? Or did he just confuse one of the most simple to use file sharing sites (also had some of the fewest limits) in the past decade? RIP Megaupload.
    Reply
  • gwolfman
    Just use JDownloader and stop worrying about the waiting. Tired of captchas? Try captcha trader.
    Reply
  • NuclearShadow
    Besides, illegal file sharing is the only reason anonymity is such a big deal.

    I disagree with this totally. Privacy issues remain and with ties with accounts and how companies love to track consumers in every way possible now. If I were to upload something that isn't infringing on copyright laws but simply do not want that upload to be associated with me personally I can no longer do such. Privacy does not mean you are doing something illegal behind the curtains.

    If anything I think anonymity needs to once again return to the norm on the internet. The reason for this is because the internet is the best way for the common man to find a way to express themselves and have other hear. If I lived in a nation that had a government that just isn't really that into human rights, I could use a anonymous service that is hosted outside of my country to get my voice our or perhaps a video of what they are doing to
    people to help global attention to the issue. If you tie me into a account this becomes more risky. Even worse with how corporations today have happily shown they are willing to cave into the demands of these governments. I'll side with law breaking websites that at-least believe in the freedom of speech before a corporation that would point at me and send me to the gallows any-day.
    Reply
  • quantumrand
    noisoundAlthough the author is correct on Megaupload using pop-up ads, I disagree on the "misleading download buttons". How is 2 big buttons, one for premium, one for non-premium after 25-45 second wait misleading? Or did he just confuse one of the most simple to use file sharing sites (also had some of the fewest limits) in the past decade? RIP Megaupload.
    It's not necessarily the upload sites themselves, but the advertisers they deal with that create ads that have big buttons that say "Download" and lead to adware programs and the like.

    NuclearShadowI disagree with this totally. Privacy issues remain and with ties with accounts and how companies love to track consumers in every way possible now. If I were to upload something that isn't infringing on copyright laws but simply do not want that upload to be associated with me personally I can no longer do such. Privacy does not mean you are doing something illegal behind the curtains. If anything I think anonymity needs to once again return to the norm on the internet. The reason for this is because the internet is the best way for the common man to find a way to express themselves and have other hear. If I lived in a nation that had a government that just isn't really that into human rights, I could use a anonymous service that is hosted outside of my country to get my voice our or perhaps a video of what they are doing to people to help global attention to the issue. If you tie me into a account this becomes more risky. Even worse with how corporations today have happily shown they are willing to cave into the demands of these governments. I'll side with law breaking websites that at-least believe in the freedom of speech before a corporation that would point at me and send me to the gallows any-day.
    There are different levels of anonymity on the internet. Some upload sites don't even log your IP when you upload a file, and that's about as anonymous as you can get.

    Most upload sites do track your IP though, and that's pretty close to the same level of anonymity you'd get from a lot of the cloud storage sites. The majority of the cloud sites don't make any of your information available to the public. It's the authorities that have potential access to that kind of info.
    Reply
  • lacisnesnon
    put.io became my new favourite download site after filesonic closed down.
    Reply
  • lost_in
    We won’t shed many tears for the loss of a site that preyed on its users with pop-up ads and misleading “download” buttons;

    thei's a thing called adblock and am I the only one who has heard of thing called jDownloader or Mipony? I think not. just copy link and poof...
    also "entertainment industry" says it costed like 500 mil. in lost revenues..MU had like 150 mil. users. lets for the sake of argument say 10 mil. users had monthly subscription of 15$/month. that's 150 mil./month and 150 mil. * 12 is lot of money...maybe "entertainment industry" should have bought MU..taken control over it...but why would they? they are just stubborn......and its gonna cost them
    Reply
  • lost_in
    sorry for double post but here's a screenshot of MF on chrome with adblock installed....
    Reply