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HP DV1000T Is Happy In The Office Or The Den

Intel's 945PM/GM Chipset Technology

Before we move on to testing the HP DV1000T, I need to introduce you to Intel's new 945PM/GM chipset technology. This will help you better appreciate some of the tests that are to come. Again let me note that we will be publishing a more detailed look at the 945GM chipset soon.

The two key aspects of Intel's Centrino Duo Mobile technology are Core Duo mobile CPUs and the 945PM Express and 945GM Express chipsets. The 945PM is used in mobile computers with discrete graphics processors - graphics processors that are external to the 945 chipset - and provides all chipset functionality but the graphics functionality provided by the discrete graphics processor itself. The 945GM, which also supports discrete processors but is not as cost effective as the 945PM if a discrete processor is used, includes an integrated graphics processor, the Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 950 (GMA 950). Aside from the graphics differences, the two chips are identical.

The following table shows the characteristics of the two chips. It is based on Intel specifications data.

Mobile Intel 945GM Express ChipsetMobile Intel 945PM Express Chipset
Processors SupportedIntel Core Duo processor
Intel Core Duo processor Low Voltage (LV)
Intel Core Duo processor Ultra Low Voltage (ULV)
Intel Core Solo processor
Intel Core Solo processor Ultra Low Voltage (ULV)
Intel Celeron M processor
Intel Celeron M processor Ultra Low Voltage (ULV)
Intel Core Duo processor
Intel Core Duo processor Low Voltage (LV)
Intel Core Duo processor Ultra Low Voltage (ULV)
Intel Core Solo processor
Intel Core Solo processor Ultra Low Voltage (ULV)
Intel Celeron M processor
Intel Celeron M processor Ultra Low Voltage (ULV)
FSB Speed667 MHz
533 MHz
667 MHz
533 MHz
#SO-DIMMs/Max Memory2 SO-DIMMs / up to 4 GB Max System Memory @ 533 MHz (use with 667 MHz memory not validated)2 SO-DIMMs / up to 4 GB Max System Memory @ 533 MHz (use with 667 MHz memory not validated)
Memory TypeDDR2 667 MHz
DDR2 533 MHz
DDR2 667 MHz
DDR2 533 MHz
Memory ChannelsDual/Single ChannelDual/Single Channel
ECC ParityNoNo
Integrated GraphicsIntel GMA 950N/A
Discrete GraphicsPCI Express x16PCI Express x16
Integrated TV OutYesN/A
Max Panel Display ResolutionLVDS: Up to UXGA (1600x1200)N/A
Dual Display OptionsConcurrent/SimultaneousConcurrent/Simultaneous
Power ManagementEnhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology, Deeper SleepEnhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology, Deeper Sleep
Intel Display Power Savings TechnologyYesN/A
PCI Masters77
IDE / ATAATA 100 (1 Ch.)
SATA 150 (2 Ports)
ATA 100 (1 Ch.)
SATA 150 (2 Ports)
USB8 Ports USB 2.08 Ports USB 2.0
Integrated LAN MAC (w/10/100 Ethernet or HTNA)YesYes
PCI Express I/O Ports4X1 PCI Express Ports4X1 PCI Express Ports
Audio CircuitryIntel High Definition Audio 24bit 192KHz, AC'97 2.3 AudioIntel High Definition Audio 24bit 192KHz, AC'97 2.3 Audio
Supported ICH82801 GBM / 82801GHM82801 GBM / 82801GHM

The HP DV1000T has the 945GM Express chipset and borrows up to 128 MB of system memory for graphics processing. The N6410, with a separate ATI Mobility Radeon X1400 graphics processor (128 MB of dedicated memory and the ability to use up to 128 MB of shared systen memory) uses the 945PM Express chipset. Both graphics processors can do 2D and 3D graphics. As you will see the ATI processor is the better performer of the two.

This is the interface used to modify the characteristics of the Intel GMA 950 graphics processor.

Before we leave our discussion of the 945GM/PM chipset, I need to call your attention to one of the rows in the above table, the one labeled "#SO-DIMMS/Max Memory." Check out the phrase in each column "(use with 667 MHz memory not validated)." Say what? Well at least one reason for the caveat has to do with system memory clock specs. It turns out that system memory clocks in some 945GM/PM based systems don't or at least at one time didn't meet DDR2 667 MHz DRAM device jitter requirements. This can cause problems with DDR2 667 MHz memory timing, if the memory doesn't meet all of the other requirements for DDR2 DRAM from Intel and JEDEC, the semiconductor engineering standardization body of the Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA). Intel claims that no functional memory failures have been observed.