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GM's Prototype EN-V: The Next-Gen People Mover

While CES is generally packed full of computing devices and other electronics, GM was demonstrating one of its concept vehicles that could give a peek at the future of transport.

A fully working demo of the EN-V, short for Electric Networked Vehicle, is GM's vision of the future of urban personal mobility. Using a driving course set up outside of the Las Vegas Convention Center, GM demonstrated the autonomous driving capabilities of EN-V, including a feature that would allow the vehicles to park themselves and automatically return to the user when summoned from a smartphone application.

At less than half the length of a Smart ForTwo six EN-Vs can fit into a standard American parking space while oneself-balancing two-wheeled EN-V provides interior space for two passengers.  Using its sophisticated sensing technology, EN-V can detect obstacles in its path, including pedestrians or other vehicles, and automatically come to a stop.

The EN-V was also happy to work inside a ballroom of the Wynn hotel. We thought it was more interesting seeing it indoors. Check it out below:

Following CES, the EN-V vehicles will be on static display at North American International Auto Show in Detroit and make selected appearances around the United States.

  • mdsiu
    Top speed?
    Reply
  • chronicbint
    There is no way you would fit 2 standard Americans in one of those. You would struggle with one.
    Reply
  • lamorpa
    Definitely going to much more successful than the GM EV1 (http://www.generationev.com/)
    Reply
  • Hellbound
    Unless it can safely hit the streets, dont call it a people mover. And dont try and convince me that thing is safe traveling 30mph+...
    Reply
  • unlicensedhitman
    Maybe attach a vacuum to it?
    Reply
  • Oh Yeah,
    That will replace my SUV...........NOT
    that is until there is a government mandate :(
    Reply
  • pinkfloydminnesota
    The present automobile is ubiquitous because of government regulations designed to make them so.

    Streets can be regulated in a manner to make alternative vehicles safe and practical.

    Inner city streets do not have to be designed to carry traffic the same way inter city highways carry traffic.
    Reply
  • pbrigido
    This is the first car I have seen that my Honda Civic stands a chance against in a head on collision.
    Reply
  • f-14
    pinkfloydminnesota Inner city streets do not have to be designed to carry traffic the same way inter city highways carry traffic.i beg to differ, you do like your groceries, furniture and other products you get and use in your every day life right? do you really think they bring crates of your starbucks coffee to the store in golf carts? don't ever move as you will have to carry your stuff by hand esp. that nice comfy couch to where ever the nearest road capable of handling a moving van is. i wonder what you will do when your refigerator or stove ever need to be replaced. if your in the northern latitudes this thing would never make it in the snow, and a small enough snow plow would be so small and light after the 2nd-3rd snow they'd be unable to plow your streets
    Reply
  • f-14
    there's a golf cart at caltech that does more and better and carriers 4 people.
    these are just research vehicles, they would never actually even get to the NTSB or see a public road with out the road being shut down for experimental use. this thing looks like an egg which brings to mind this age old paradox:
    which came first chicken or the egg?
    in the case of this machine, driving on the same road as any other GM product like my K2500 or a Mac/International/Peterbuilt/Freightliner is going to result in a game of chicken where the egg gets turned into a dull redish brown stain on the road.
    i personally know of several pothole that would eat this thing for breakfast, so who wants to get scrambled/poached or turned overeasy?
    Reply