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Woman Arrested: Craigslist Ad Targeting Teen

A St. Peters, Missouri woman faces felony harassment (cyberbullying) charges for posting a fake ad in the "casual encounters" section of Craigslist. Elizabeth A. Thrasher, 40, allegedly posted photos and personal information of a 17-year-old girl after a recent argument with the girl's mother over the Internet. The listing, containing the girl's employer, email address and cellphone number, implied that the girl was seeking a sexual encounter.

Both the L.A. Times and the Associated Press reports that the girl was actually the daughter of Thrasher's ex-husband's girlfriend. After the argument between Thrasher and the ex-girlfriend, the daughter allegedly sent Thrasher a message via MySpace. In retaliation, Thrasher posted the Craigslist ad, posing as the 17-year-old girl looking for sex.

Eventually the girl contacted police after receiving several "lewd" messages and photographs from men she did not know. Thanks to the Missouri legislature passed in regards to the MySpace cyberbullying incident that led to 13-year-old Megan Meier's suicide, Thrasher now faces felony charges that could lead to a maximum of four years in prison and a $5,000 fine if found guilty. The crime is deemed as a felony because the girl is under 18, and Thrasher is over 21.

Thrasher was released from police custody on a $10,000 bond. Her attorney, Michael Kielty, said that the Craigslist ad was no different than writing a number on a bathroom wall. "It may be in poor taste. It may be inappropriate, but it's not criminal behavior," Kielty said. There was also mention that the listing was merely a "practical joke."

Currently Thrasher is banned from using the Internet.

  • SneakySnake
    what a b!tch
    Reply
  • jerreece
    How about some kind of charge for trying to run a brothel, or something in regards to trying to sell a minor for sex, or something like that.

    What a piece of trash that woman is for doing this. It's to bad 40 year old 'adults' can't actually act like adults in today's age.
    Reply
  • daship
    Good. The punishment should be much harsher though. 25 years without parol would set a nice example.

    The problem with USA is punishments arent harsh enough.

    Drinking and driveing should be death penalty, and theft should be get hands cut off.

    Downloading movies/songs should be legal. What if the Riaa owned the government when radio was invented.
    Reply
  • virtualban
    Although what's wrong might seem pretty obvious in some cases, it really needs a lot of deep thought to draw a line, freedom of speech, practical jokes, stolen identities, made up identities...
    Until enough experience is gained it might be wiser to just let common sense decide.
    Just hope that the jury can meditate deep enough.
    Reply
  • cekasone
    I agree that what Thrasher has done is horrible, but how in the hell do you ban someone from the internet. She can just use anyone's computer.
    Reply
  • virtualban
    If this case passes through unpunished, it will go as an example to others, faking identities is a big no no! but then it could be pushed up to always using your real credentials for whatever you do online (good for anti spam, but bad for personal safety)...
    Reply
  • geoffs
    Thanks to the Missouri legislature passed in regards to the MySpace cyberbullying incident...
    "law" is missing in the article, but I assume that's what it should saw.
    Her attorney, Michael Kielty, said ... "It may be in poor taste. It may be inappropriate, but it's not criminal behavior,"
    Time to get a new attorney. Apparently, Mr Kielty fails to understand that when something is against the law, it is by definition criminal behavior. He can argue that the law is invalid, inappropriate, or unjust, and that it shouldn't be criminal behavior, but at this time it is a crime in Missouri.
    Reply
  • geoffs
    what it should saw.
    what it should say.
    Reply
  • netbanshee
    Some names fit the person.
    Reply
  • virtualban
    This 'case' had consequences on the minor enough for suspicion and calling the cops, but consequences can be as little as someone laughing a bit at your back when you walk by, and you might never notice, or even if you might think you've done something (bad hair :P) and live your life as always just because you haven't checked craiglist that day (or never).
    Reply