Skip to main content

Panasonic Reveals LED-Based Light Bulbs

During a press conference held today in Tokyo, Panasonic revealed its new EVERLEDS LED line-up consisting of eight LED-based light light bulbs that are supposedly, according to the company, the most energy efficient, lightest and smallest LED-based light bulbs in the industry. Unfortunately, the bulbs aren't ready for American shores just yet, however the LED bulbs are set to go on sale in Japan on October 21.

According to Panasonic, the new LED bulbs use the company's heat dissipation technology to increase the bulb's energy-efficiency. This means that as the LED bulb decreases in temperature, the LED's luminous efficiency increases. The achieve this, Panasonic applied a treatment of alumite on the surface to increase heat dissipation. Panasonic said that "tightly" joining the LED package and the casing helped achieve the high energy efficiency as well.

"When used as a downlight, the 6.9 W standard type LED bulbs deliver the brightness equivalent to 60 W incandescent bulbs," the company said. "That means it can save up to 2,000 yen per year on energy bills. The 4.0 W standard and 5.5 W compact LED bulbs produce the output comparable to 40 W incandescents and the 7.6 W standard LED bulbs have the brightness of 60 W incandescents when used as a downlight."

Panasonic said that the LED bulbs are the lightest in the industry due to their thin casing and a large reduction in aluminum. The standard size E26 base bulb weighs only 3.5 ounces and the compact size E17 base bulb weighs 1.75 ounces. Hopefully Panasonic's EVERLEDS will hit our shores by the end of the year.

  • saljr
    I hope more company's join the Panasonic producing LED lights. That will help bring the cost down. My next purchase is going to be a LED monitor.
    Reply
  • opmopadop
    "When used as a downlight, the 6.9 W standard type LED bulbs deliver the brightness equivalent to 60 W"
    ...
    "the 7.6 W standard LED bulbs have the brightness of 60 W incandescents when used as a downlight."

    So, which is it...
    Reply
  • xyz001
    Also how is the light quality of these? (the CRI value) Is it as bad as the compact fluorescent lamps? Or comparable to incandescent lamps?

    The biggest issue with energy saving lamps to day is that the light quality sucks.
    Reply
  • Andraxxus
    This sounds good but what is the price?
    Reply
  • bin1127
    Great stuff. When we get them in NA i'll switch out my 1kW halogens.
    Reply
  • TidalWaveOne
    I have found energy saving bulbs that have fine light quality. You just have to be careful which ones you get.
    Reply
  • blackbeastofaaaaagh
    > The biggest issue with energy saving lamps to day is that the light quality sucks.

    I personally, am very obsessive-compulsive about light quality. The finest reading lamp I've used (own two of them) is a Halley Desk Lamp (distributed by Lucesco). It uses an array of 15 led bulbs and the light is very bright, clear (free of dominant color bands) and well-focused (like a halogen reflector bulb) and is dimmable. It's little wonder that this lamp is very popular in art galleries to highlight individual art pieces.

    So in principle an LED can be better than even top grade halogen reflector bulbs.

    FYI: You can actually buy CFL lamps in different color temperatures. The light quality of some of them are as good as any incandescent bulbs. I have had excellent results with GE Softwhite dimmable bulbs used in conventinal light fixtures. However, being as finicky as I am, their light is too diffuse and creates a dull environment. A properly lit room should not be flooded with light; Makes everything look flat and dulls the mood. A room should have proper bright spots and shadows, so for now I stick with halogen reflector track lights.

    Reply
  • xyz001
    >blackbeast

    Gotta check out your LED lamp.

    The dullness of CFL lamps is not so much due to their color temperature, but to their low CRI (color rendering index) value. Daylght has a CRI value of 100. Incandescent lamps and halogen also has close to 100. But most CFL lamps have only 80. This means that 20% of the colors that the ligth hits dont really reflect and become visible. Look at the two picturs of a red shirt on this link (dont mind the language) One is taken in energy saving light, the other in incandescent.

    http://politiken.dk/tjek/bolig/energi/article588942.ece

    I have read though that you can but types of CFL that has 5 layers of phosphor (compared to normally 3) This should give a CRI value of 90. But they also use the double amount of watts.
    Reply
  • we are led lighting factory.www.ledsupport.net
    Reply