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Google Chromium Browser Gets Do-Not-Track Support

The integration of do-not-track (DNT) in Chrome makes absolutely no sense for Google, yet the latest versions of Chromium have showed up with a flag that enables this feature. Google is last among the big browser makers and follows a trend that was initiated by Mozilla. However, Google announced earlier this year that it would be offering DNT in Chrome by the end of the year. It is widely believed that Google reacted to a new privacy bill of rights.

Google has been very quiet about DNT with very good reason. Chrome is Google's most powerful tool to bind Internet users to its search engine and the company's core revenue base. Comprehensive tracking is a feature advertisers are looking for and serves as a catalyst for higher ad prices. Of course, the agreement on DNT is that this feature will be simply integrated, but not be enabled by default. The browser user will have to make that choice and activate DNT in the browser's settings. Only Microsoft has opted to enable DNT automatically.

The advertising industry is already reacting to a potential impact of DNT. A patent filed by Yahoo for example, envisions incentives for users who do not activate DNT in their browsers. If Yahoo has its way, one day you may get free products or even cash if you allow advertisers to track your steps online.

 

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  • merikafyeah
    Don't be evil? Mother of god! A manifestation!!
    Reply
  • livebriand
    Of course, DNT doesn't actually do anything - all it does is politely tell advertisers not to track you. It doesn't actually stop them.

    It's funny that they waited a while to do this though, when the 'Keep My Opt-Outs' addon has been available for quite a while now.
    Reply
  • southernshark
    Of course Google will still track you.

    Can't believe people even use that browser.
    Reply
  • phyco126
    I'm still waiting for a do not track feature that prevents ISPs from tracking you too...
    Reply
  • jimmyjohnz
    Can somebody please answer me why I should really care if they track me? Google makes money off of selling advertising places and give me ads catered to my preferences. I don't see these ads though, due to adblock. I like Google as a company, should I not provide them a source of income for the money they spend providing such excellent applications?
    Reply
  • @phyco126 already exists...It's called VPN.
    http://topvpnreviews.net/
    http://www.bestvpnservice.com/top-ten-providers.php
    Reply
  • Pherule
    phyco126I'm still waiting for a do not track feature that prevents ISPs from tracking you too...Unfortunately TOR or a secure tunnel to a 3rd party proxy is the only way to do this, afaik.

    Opera offers Turbo mode as a proxy, I wonder why other browsers don't do this as well, only instead of using it for reducing bandwidth, use it for protection against snooping ISPs.
    Reply
  • elfsun
    I don't think this plugin will make any difference. Can it really protect your privacy? I doubt it.
    How about making a "Do not crash" plus? LoL.
    My chrome do crash sometimes although not very often. But it's still one of my main browsers(I still have ie9,firefox and Avant browser).Like it fast speed and simple interface.
    Reply
  • cats_Paw
    I think if they let me turn on or off tracking, i will allow them to track me after all (unless ofc i want to do something bad :D). After all, i dont care what flashy ADs i get to see in my browser while im reading an article.

    If we even get something thanks to that... well, i knew i liked the internet for some reason, but damn...
    Reply
  • jimmyjohnz: All databases can and will be hacked. Everywhere your device has been. Everywhere you've been on the web. Hmmm...Jimmy looks at atheist websites; we're a Christian company. Next!.....Uncle Jimmy looks at diaper porn......Jimmy's googled diabetes sites; he's among the 7% that we're laying off......Jimmy's mail-order genome is completely compatible with the Senator's granddaughter's; let's see where he lives, so that we can send a team around to harvest his kidneys.
    Reply