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New Surface Pro X benchmarks reveal faster Snapdragon CPU

Surface Pro X
(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Things in the Surface Pro X world have been awfully quiet since the 2-in-1 launched to mixed reviews last year. However, a new Surface Pro that sounds an awful lot like a variation on the Pro X has been spotted online — and it's running a new Snapdragon processor that could give the Surface Pro X some help making a dent in the market.

This news comes to us from Windows Latest, which spied an unnamed Surface Pro's results publicly posted to the Geekbench 5 website. While the entry doesn't bear the branding, its connection can be sussed out by its moniker "OEMSR OEMSR Product Name DV."

This new Surface Pro is suspected of running on a rumored "Snapdragon 8cx Plus" chip, and the Geekbench page specifies that this machine runs on an octa-core 3.15 GHz processor. The original Surface Pro X ran on a 3.0 GHz Snapdragon-based system-on-a-chip. Geekbench 5 wasn't out when the original Surface Pro X came out, so we can't compare this new model's 3,092 multi-core score against it.

That being said, our Intel Core i7-powered Surface Book 3 earned a 3,831 on the GB5 multi-score test, which speeds past this posted score.

The even more important part of this new Surface Pro X could be its increased compatibility. Windows Latest notes that the Snapdragon 8cx Plus is expected to support 64-bit app emulation. If that includes x86 64-bit apps (and that's a big if), that would help the Surface Pro X, which was heavily maligned for its inability to run some applications.

Last week, Apple revealed that it's finally working on its own ARM-powered Macs that will be powered by the company's proprietary Apple Silicon chips. If Windows can also move towards the ARM side of the market, it would make for a more harmonious future when it comes to cross-platform emulation and virtualization. Without ARM PCs having some success, Boot Camp is practically dead on the Mac, and the folks at Parallels Desktop would have to work some serious mojo to let Macs run any Windows environments.