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Apple reportedly delays MacBook and iPad production — here’s why

iPad Pro 11 Mini LED display rumor
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Apple may be delaying the production of its new MacBooks and iPads. It’s all thanks to the ongoing global chip shortage that’s affecting the production of everything from PS5 and Xbox Series X consoles to smartphones and even cars.

This news comes from financial publication Nikkei Asia, which put Apple's potential issue down to a lack of mounting components for MacBooks as well as a shortage of iPad displays and related components. 

The good news is that this won’t prevent you from being able to buy new Apple products. It just means that Apple has had to push some of its production back to the second half of 2021, with the company’s supply chain getting even tighter as the year goes on.

So far, reports say iPhone 13 and other Apple phone production haven’t been affected. But sources told Nikkei Asia that the supply of some components is “quite tight,” which may complicate matters further down the line.

Apple has managed to weather the chip shortage quite well so far. This is likely down to the fact it has a history of being able to quickly rally its suppliers, along with its experience in managing the complexities of its existing supply chain. The fact that the chip shortage is affecting Apple suggests that the overall semiconductor shortage is getting increasingly serious.

Apple isn’t the only tech company that’s been affected by the issue either. Samsung may be postponing the Galaxy Note 21 handset until 2022, thanks to a shortage of semiconductors. Likewise, existing issues with PS5 restocks and Xbox Series X restocks have worsened because Microsoft and Sony can’t get the components they need to increase production.

Hopefully, as more large companies are affected by the chip shortage, the more they’ll work to try and rectify the problem. While it’s not possible for them to do anything about increased demand for electronics, they could work together to try and unlock more production capacity. 

After all, they all have plenty to lose if things get even worse. Especially the smaller companies that don’t have the same sort of pull as the Apples or Microsofts of the world.