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Amazon Opposes Google Book Deal

Amazon has added itself to the list of companies, countries and antitrust entities opposed to the book deal penned by Google and the Authors Guild in October of last year. The Associated Press quotes the etailer as saying the deal is, "a high-tech form of the backroom agreements that are the stuff of antitrust nightmares."

In a lengthy filing, Amazon detailed that the deal would give Google an unfair advantage when it came to pricing.

"Google's ability to offer and sell far more titles than Amazon and other booksellers will make Google's Web site the destination of choice for persons desiring to view or purchase books over the Internet," Amazon said. "Google will certainly find a way to use that economic advantage to make consumers pay more."

The Associated Press reports that Amazon's 41-page brief filed this week is just one of many expected as the Friday deadline for opposing the settlement approaches. However, while world+dog are slamming the deal, Google seems surprisingly calm about the whole thing.

"The Google books settlement is injecting more competition into the digital books space, so it's understandable why our competitors might fight hard to prevent more competition," Google spokesman Gabriel Stricker said in a statement to the AP.

Read the full story here.

  • tayb
    Google should just back out before the EU has another chance to finance their economic recovery. They backed out of the Yahoo deal I wonder if they fight this one.
    Reply
  • Xeddicus
    This sounds worse than the crap Microsoft had to deal with for IE (the hypocrites). If enough people vote they don't want Google giving people a better deal then THEIR company they'll kill Googles legal attempt to make money. Google should just sue them all for all the revenue these companies will cost them.
    Reply
  • john3k
    I am glad a lot of attention is being paid to access to books. After all, it will impact how all of us get our information, especially books that have long been published. A lot of news organizations are also changing the way they provide content and that is a evolving model.

    The slight irony is the reason I hesitate to get a Kindle is due to the closed eco-system of the Kindle system, which makes Amazon the gatekeeper in that case. I much prefer an open approach with no single gatekeeper to keep competition healthy.

    Another irony is that Amazon does have an awesome MP3 store that is DRM-free with a large selection and often good prices. Yet that is a completely open format, which is preferable.

    On the note about Amazon, I recently came across an interesting table that details the discounts on Amazon.

    It is at
    Maybe someone will find it useful too. While you are there, I would suggest checking out the "Amazon Filler Item" among other things there when you get a chance. It's quite amusing.
    Reply
  • john3k
    Let me try again, not sure what messed up my post.

    I am glad a lot of attention is being paid to access to books. After all, it will impact how all of us get our information, especially books that have long been published. A lot of news organizations are also changing the way they provide content and that is a evolving model.

    The slight irony is the reason I hesitate to get a Kindle is due to the closed eco-system of the Kindle system, which makes Amazon the gatekeeper in that case. I much prefer an open approach with no single gatekeeper to keep competition healthy.

    Another irony is that Amazon does have an awesome MP3 store that is DRM-free with a large selection and often good prices. Yet that is a completely open format, which is preferable.

    On the note about Amazon, I recently came across an interesting table that details the discounts on Amazon.

    It is at
    Maybe someone will find it useful too. While you are there, I would suggest checking out the "Amazon Filler Item" among other things there when you get a chance. It's quite amusing.
    Reply
  • Shadow703793
    I'm sure Microsoft, Amazon, Yahoo are just bitter for not doing this before Google. As for the EU,etc they are being payed by Microsoft,etc and they don't want people to learn.
    Reply
  • icepick314
    so Amazon is worried that there's another competition?

    is that what all these whining's all about?
    Reply
  • Hanin33
    why are the book dealers that feel they're going to be robbed by this deal not approaching the author's guild that proposes to give google the ability to do wot they claim will happen? it's not like google is granting itself the power to sell any book they wish.... why are they going after the buyer of rights when the seller is more responsible for distributing profits to their clients... in this case the authors themselves?
    Reply
  • gorehound
    i buy a lot of books and they are all well BOOKS.............
    not digital files
    i own over a 1,000 books and i have lots of hard cover 1st editions.
    i can resell my books and never lose money as they go up in value.
    i refuse to buy into kindles or e-readers.
    NO WAY !!!!
    Reply
  • outlw6669
    So, competition to amazon's services coupled with a growing library of free books is supposed raise to costs to consumers O_o
    I think not.

    I for one would welcome as much competition in the eBook arena as possible.
    Seriously, charging nearly the same as an actual hard copy book for a digital download?
    Reply