MacBook Pro 2023 leaker just tipped three major upgrades

MacBook Pro 16-inch 2021 sitting on a patio table

As impressive as the Apple M2 chip is inside the MacBook Air M2 and MacBook Pro M2 13-inch, it will be surpassed soon. A new leak from tipster LeaksApplePro says to expect big things from the 2023 MacBook Pros, which will likely pack new M2 Pro and M2 Max chips. 

Speaking on Twitter (opens in new tab), the leaker claims that the performance on the 2023 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pros will be “worth the wait." Apparently the new Apple laptops will offer better speeds, longer battery life and will produce less heat in the process. However, they may not come with any design or port changes this time around.

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None of that is particularly surprising. After all, the 2021 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pros already introduced a refreshed design — complete with a new selection of ports. Similarly, the fact that the newer M2 variants will offer better power and efficiency is almost a given, since that’s been the case with previous Apple Silicon releases as far back as the original M1.

Leaked benchmarks for the MacBook Pro with M2 Max suggest a hefty power boost is coming, compared to the M1 Max. The M2 Max will reportedly offer a 12-core CPU (up from the M2’s 8 cores), 38 graphics cores and support for up to 96GB of RAM.

It’s not clear what the M2 Pro will offer, though its hardware specs are likely to sit somewhere between the M2 Max and the standard M2 chip. Both incoming MacBook Pros are also said to offer faster LPDDR5X RAM, which would offer the machines much better bandwidth for work with high-intensity apps.

It’s still not entirely clear when the next wave of MacBook Pros will be revealed. We’ll be on the lookout for news and rumors, so be sure to bookmark our MacBook Pro M2 Pro hub for the latest info. 

Next: iPhone 15 Ultra just tipped for a huge price hike. Now this is high. 

Tom Pritchard
Automotive Editor

Tom is the Tom's Guide's Automotive Editor, which means he can usually be found knee deep in stats the latest and best electric cars, or checking out some sort of driving gadget. It's long way from his days as editor of Gizmodo UK, when pretty much everything was on the table. He’s usually found trying to squeeze another giant Lego set onto the shelf, draining very large cups of coffee, or complaining that Ikea won’t let him buy the stuff he really needs online.