Best Drones 2015

Drones aren't just for paparazzi and film crews anymore. A simple beginner's model can cost less than $100, with camera drones starting at a few hundred dollars. More complex drones, starting at less than $1,000, offer customizable and programmable features, turning them into truly autonomous devices that can make their own decisions.

Read on to see our choices for different types of flying and budgets. Below our recommendations, you can find our tips on shopping for a drone and what rules you need to follow.

What You Need to Know Before You Buy and Fly

Drones aren't that complicated, but there are a few key features you should consider when you are shopping. There are also some key rules you need to follow when you take to the air.

Legal Requirements

You don't need a license to operate a recreational drone, but the FAA has rules you have to follow. The most important two: Never fly around or above people, and always keep your drone in sight. The FAA has a full list of safety guidelines for model aircraft that you should check before you take off. There are also restrictions on where you can fly: For example, within 5 miles of an airport is off limits. Mapbox provides a great interactive map of no-fly areas, and local RC (Remote Control) aircraft clubs may list fields that they use.

Drone Controls

Most drones use a remote control with two joysticks — a bit like an Xbox or PlayStation controller. One stick controls what's called the attitude of the quadcopter, including roll (tilting left and right) and pitch (tilting up and down). The other stick controls throttle and the rotation of the quadcopter. A good remote control should fit well in the hand, with sticks resting comfortably under your thumbs and providing a smooth, responsive feel that allows you to guide the quadcopter by touch.

Some models skip the remote control, or offer it as an extra-cost feature, and instead use a smartphone connected via Wi-Fi and a flying app. These apps often provide a live video view from the quadcopter camera. However, apps don’t allow the precision of real controllers: It is easier for your thumbs to slip, possibly causing a crash.

Construction and Repair

Despite what the ads tell you, drones crash all the time. A good drone will take an unplanned descent and ground interface (aka: a crash) in stride, without damaging the frame. It will also include shields to protect the rotors and electronics from harm.

Regardless, things still get broken sometimes. A good drone will offer a ready supply of cheap parts like rotors and struts to replace the broken ones, and will make it easy to swap these parts out when required. The same is true of batteries.


Very few drones offer more than 10 to 20 minutes of battery life, so an easily swapped battery can give you more flying time without hassle. This tends to be a feature of more expensive models, with a spare battery typically costing more than $100. Cheap drones (under about $400) usually have built-in batteries that can't be swapped out.


Want to show off your aerial exploits? A camera, either built-in or add-on, can capture those dramatic vistas for posterity. Most budget models use the equivalent of a cheap webcam, capturing low-resolution video (usually 640 x 480-pixel resolution) to an internal memory card for later viewing.

More sophisticated models offer high-definition video capture or the ability to connect an HD action camera such as a GoPro. Some drones also offer first-person view (FPV), sending a pilot's-eye view from the drone itself to a phone or tablet. Some models offer video goggles for the ultimate pilot-seat flying experience.

Related Buying Guides
Best TVs
Best Smartwatches
Best 3D Printers 
Create a new thread in the Drones & Robots forum about this subject
    Your comment
  • Where can you buy a phantom 3 for 675?
  • Brendan, SamsClub I think.
    I just got the U818A HD+ (under the brand name 'Holy Stone'). I wanted something a little better than the regular U818A and the Blade Nano QX seemed too much like a toy. With the 90 dollar U818A HD+ (it's more upgraded than the U818A mentioned in this article, it has a 720p camera, return to home and headless features) I hope to learn to fly a drone and see if I enjoy it. I think it borders between a toy and a real drone. If the neighbors or whomever gets upset about the drone I can say "Relax, it's not a professional drone, it's just a cheap toy drone" and they'll be like "oh, ok. cool toy" and then let me fly/learn in peace. Once I master the U818A HD+ if I really enjoy it and want something more, next stop will be the DJI Phantom 3. But I figured besides learning to fly one, I'll get a better sense of peoples reactions around my house and around the park when I fly the drone. If I encounter nothing but resistance, or I simply don'y enjoy it, then at least I didn't waste 650.