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Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit review

This kit may have some great options, but it still skips key essentials

Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit
(Image: © Everlit)

Tom's Guide Verdict

It may have an air compressor and long jumper cables, but the Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit falls short of being able to deal with a variety of emergencies by leaving out key essentials. Too bad there’s no room for adding these things to the bag.

Pros

  • +

    Includes tire inflator

  • +

    12-foot jumper cables

  • +

    Self-powered flashlight

  • +

    13 major items

Cons

  • -

    Lacks key essentials like a fire extinguisher

  • -

    No room for adding extras

Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit: Contents

Size: 17.0 x 6.5 x 8.0 inches
Weight: 7.8 pounds
Number of items: 13
Jumper cables/length: Yes/12-feet
First aid kit: Yes  
Air pump: Yes
Shovel: No
Flashlight: Yes
Fire extinguisher: No
Roadside assistance: No

Selling for $70, the Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit is at the high end of the price range, but makes it more worthwhile by including a small air compressor. The company is also in the survival gear business, for any people that don't believe in the concept of being too prepared.

With a mini air compressor, the $70 Everlit Roadside Kit can help get you to a gas station to get that slowly leaking tire fixed, but falls short by not including essential items like a shovel, fire extinguisher and reflective vest. 

Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit in trunk

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Packed in a long narrow bag, the Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit measures 17.0 x 6.5 x 8.0 inches and weighs a hefty 7.8 pounds. It has a reflective stripe on both of its long sides although the bag is too big to fit under a vehicle’s seat - unless you drive a tractor. There’s no room inside for adding your own gear, like a cell phone battery, fire extinguisher or OBD scanner. The lack of an outer pocket may also be problematic for some.

Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit came with 13 major items, a far cry from the 108 that the company advertises. But it’s a good mix that will serve motorists well in an emergency.

Well designed and made, the kit comes with everything from a tow strap, gloves and bungee cords to a glass breaker, fold-out reflective triangle and poncho. It does without a safety vest, but those gloves will be a life-saver when it comes to changing a tire.

Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit contents

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The first aid kit may not be complete but it’s better than what some competitors offer. It includes things as basic as a pair of scissors and tweezers, alongside gauze pads, bandages, adhesive tape, wipes and cotton swabs. The kit includes a mylar blanket for breakdowns on a cold night.

The jumper cables have red and black clips but are not marked for positive or negative polarity, making it a little too easy to mistake them in the dark. They do have a generous 12-feet of cabling, though, which is 50 percent longer than many of its competitors.

The center of attention is the tire inflator that can pump out up to 150 pounds per square inch of pressure, and has a built in digital pressure gauge. The 10.5-feet of power cord and air hose is plenty to reach any tire while plugged in.

Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit tire pump

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The kit also includes plenty of attachments, meaning the inflator can be used to inflate air mattresses and sports equipment - though there's no place to put them. It took a quick 52 seconds to pump a tire from 20- to 35psi, significantly faster than the Lifeline’s tire inflator.

Inside the bag is the same rechargeable flashlight that many others provide, although its red color means it might be easier to find. It has three LED lighting elements and ran for over five hours after squeezing the charging handle 20 times.

Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit flaslight

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

As good as it is, the Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit falls short in several key areas, starting with the complete lack of tools - although it does come with a roll of electrical tape.

It doesn’t have a shovel, fire extinguisher or reflective vest that could be the difference in being seen or not on a dark night. There’s no accident report form that others provide, but that’s not that big a deal. sadly its lack of roadside assistance makes it pale in comparison to the Justin Case kit.

Overall, the Everlit Roadside Assistance Kit comes close to satisfying the need for safety gear in a car but falls short by missing out some important components. It’s ideal for those with leaky tires, but could leave you in the lurch with other emergencies.

Brian Nadel is a freelance writer and editor who specializes in technology reporting and reviewing. He works out of the suburban New York City area and has covered topics from nuclear power plants and Wi-Fi routers to cars and tablets. The former editor-in-chief of Mobile Computing and Communications, Nadel is the recipient of the TransPacific Writing Award.