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Panasonic DVRs with Blu-ray Recorder, VHS

Over in Japan, Panasonic has introduced the new Diga series of DVRs that will become available this September. Surprisingly, the new line of DVRs--soon available in six different models--will come with a Blu-ray recorder and a VHS player (depending on the models), and will also offer four HDD sizes: 320 GB, 500 GB, 1 TB, and 2 TB. Additionally, the entire Diga series uses the latest generation of Panasonic's UniPhier system LSI (Large Scale Integration) that incorporates new AV data compression/decompression (codec) technology.

According to Akihabara News (based on Panasonic's Japanese product page), the high-end model (DMR-BW970) will provide consumers the ability to record up to 320 hours of video in MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 @ 12.9 Mbps. This model also provides support for Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby True HD, and DTS-HD. As for Blu-ray recording, the device supports BD-RE, BD-R,  DVD-RAM, DVD-R, DVD R DL, and DVD-RW. Additional features include HDMI output, a SDHC card slot, and VIERA Link. The DVR is also DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) certified.

No information was given in regards to availability in the States, or pricing.

  • tenor77
    I want to burn my VHS tapes on Blu-Ray to so I can officially defeat the purpose of upgrading to Blu-Ray.
    Reply
  • Hanin33
    nice... about time they come out with something like this... if for nothing else to help support the seniors amongst us and their VHS collections...
    Reply
  • chuenl
    I must be in a cave for a while, since I thought nobody buys VHS anymore.
    Reply
  • jnjkele
    Nobody DOES by VHS anymore - but that doesn't mean there aren't millions upon millions of VHS tapes still floating around out there in homes who haven't the means or the inclination to re-buy their entire library due to format upgrades (not to mention old home movies). This is the perfect solution, allowing those with legacy VHS libraries to transcode their VHS to Blue-ray (provided this actually allows for that) without complicated equipment and PC software.
    Reply
  • joebob2000
    Is it possible to put low res content on a standard blu-ray disc? If so, this would be very handy for someone looking to digitize all those aging analog VHS home movies, considering one disc should hold about 50 hours of video at standard quality.
    Reply
  • ubertiger
    "Blu-yay writng"?

    WTF kind of copy and paste journalism is that? Spell check has been around for God knows how long now /facepalm. Get your act together Tom's.
    Reply
  • those that are still using VHS because they have not been willing to pony up for DVD... will NOT buy this, it will be too expensive. Blueray has a limited life. There will always be a place for disks and the convience of them... but digital downloads will trump physical media in the near future, if it hasn't already.

    and who knows what "blue yay" is? anyone?
    Reply
  • kezix_69
    LOL @ the misspell in the title. Just WOW!!

    On topic - how about they make blank blue ray discs less than $10 and get the price of recorders to come down so that we can quit wasting our time with DVDs and get everything to blue ray already...
    Reply
  • downer88
    I don't even read the articles anymore before I post a comment, I just read the handpicked troll inspiring headlines!

    Seriously, who cares about a Japan only BluE-Ray and VHS recorder anyway?
    Reply
  • downer88
    There is no "E" in Blu-Ray, now I just feel dumber for reading this article!
    Reply