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Yikes, this Netflix movie in the top 10 is 0% on Rotten Tomatoes

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The thing to remember about Netflix, and other streaming libraries, is that there’s a lot of rubbish content out there. And sometimes people watch it in such great numbers that it pops into the top 10 list. That appears to be the case with the newest Netflix movie, John Travolta’s Trading Paint.

The 2019 movie has popped into the No. 7 spot on Netflix’s list of top 10 movies, even though it managed to get the lowest of low zero percent score on Rotten Tomatoes. To be so bad that there isn’t a single good review is actually quite something. But whether it’s worth watching is another matter.

 What is Trading Paint? 

Released back in 2019, Trading Paint follows Sam Monroe (Travolta), a locally-famous stock car racer. Long-since retired, Sam’s main purpose is to support the career of his son, Cam (Tony Sebastian). But Cam’s success is hampered by lack of funding, causing him to defect to a rival team in frustration and a desire to prove himself.

Sam’s reaction is anger, followed by the decision to come out of retirement and restore his champion status. The movie also features Shania Twain as Becca, Sam’s girlfriend, and Michael Madson and Linksy, the head of the rival racing team. 

What did critics think of Trading Paint? 

A zero score on Rotten Tomatoes (opens in new tab) means that the site doesn’t have a record of Trading Paint getting a single good review. Granted, only 12 reviews are hsowing right now, but that kind of failure is almost as unprecedented as getting a full 100 percent score.

Audiences seem to agree with the assessment, with an average rating of 31% — based on over 50 ratings. Some people seemed to appreciate the movie, despite its flaws, but it’s generally disliked. IMDB is displaying a score of 4.4 out of 10 (opens in new tab), based on 2.1K ratings, while global box office takings totaled $18,566. 

Glenn Kenny at RogerEbert.com (opens in new tab) gave the movie 1.5 out of 4, calling it a “decidedly undistinguished dirt-racing film.” While Frank Schek at The Hollywood Reporter (opens in new tab) declared that “there's plenty of material here for a reasonably engrossing drama. Somehow, screenwriters Craig R. Welch and Greg Gerani fail to come up with anything remotely interesting.”

Johnny Oleksinski at New York Post (opens in new tab) noted that “there's potential for pleasure in an old story done right,” but unfortunately, “Travolta croaking out a Southern accent as he overplays his outbursts and emotional reconciliations doesn't qualify.”

Bottom Line: Should you watch Trading Paint? 

Movies are subjective, and different people like different things. Still, Trading Paint might be one for you to skip. The negative reception from audiences and critics alike is enough of an indication that this is a bad movie. And by that we mean actually bad, not the so-bad-it’s-hilarious that you get with stuff like The Room.

So unless you are really stuck for something to watch, and need to waste 90 minutes with something you don’t necessarily need to pay close attention to, Trading Paint should probably stay off your Watch List. There are plenty of better options in the top 10 list right now, including Sing 2, The Sea Beast and 12 Strong

Heck you might even be better off watching The Gray Man. Critics didn’t like it, but audiences seem to be enjoying it.

Remember when Jon Travolta used to make good movies? What the heck happened there?

Next: Amazon Prime video just canceled this show after two seasons (opens in new tab). And check out the 9 new movies and shows to watch this weekend (opens in new tab) on Netflix, HBO Max and more. 

Tom Pritchard
Tom Pritchard

Tom is the Tom's Guide's Automotive Editor, which means he can usually be found knee deep in stats the latest and best electric cars, or checking out some sort of driving gadget. It's long way from his days as editor of Gizmodo UK, when pretty much everything was on the table. He’s usually found trying to squeeze another giant Lego set onto the shelf, draining very large cups of coffee, or complaining that Ikea won’t let him buy the stuff he really needs online.