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Colossal Carbon Nanotubes Could Replace Cotton Fibers For High-tech Clothing

According to a paper published in Physical Review Letters, a new material called porous colossal carbon tubes (CCTs) shows all the characteristics that could make it suitable for clothing and a possible replacement of cotton. Compared to traditional carbon nanotubes (CNTs), these colossal carbon tubes have a much bigger size, with a diameter of between 40 and 100 μm and a length in the range of centimeters. The walls of the colossal tubes are composed of macroscopic rectangular columnar pores and exhibit an ultra low density comparable to that of carbon nanofoams.

The scientists said that the created CCTs have a unique architecture with rectangular macropores across the tube walls and layered crystal structures in the solid walls. The structure provides several interesting characteristics, such as ultralight weight, extremely high strength, excellent ductility, and high conductivity.

The researchers claim that the material has "excellent" electrical features, but the mechanics make these colossal carbon tubes especially interesting. The researchers claim that material is 15 times stronger than the strongest carbon fiber currently known (T1000). The material also revealed 30 times the tenacity of Kevlar and 224 times of individual cotton fibers.

Under stress, the material can deform and can deal with a 3 percent strain before fracture occurs.

The scientists believe that the similarity to cotton fibers in terms of size are close enough to use conventional textile technologies to create CCT fabrics that are much stronger than any current fabrics. Body armors and
lightweight, high strength composite structures come to mind. The scientists also envision in-situ self-healing composite structures, medical devices to deliver/release multiple drugs simultaneously, and micro-electromechanical systems as possible application areas for their material.

No actual products based on CCTs have been announced.

  • spaztic7
    I believe this would be the Crysis body armor or the Hazard Suit from HL2 they speak of.
    Reply
  • jaragon13
    spaztic7I believe this would be the Crysis body armor or the Hazard Suit from HL2 they speak of.I agree.
    Reply
  • Pei-chen
    spaztic7I believe this would be the Crysis body armor or the Hazard Suit from HL2 they speak of.The Batsuit seemd to be made from the same meterial.
    Reply
  • ssalim
    Oh yea as Crysis armor is called nanosuit. Questions are: 1) how expensive these would be? 2) Is it comfortable to wear? 3) Is it easy to clean and is it easy to get dirty? 4) Any side effect from wearing it overnight? 5) Is it environmentally safe to produce and discard these 'nanosuits'?
    Reply
  • ssalim
    Oh yea as Crysis armor is called nanosuit. Questions are: 1) how expensive these would be? 2) Is it comfortable to wear? 3) Is it easy to clean and is it easy to get dirty? 4) Any side effect from wearing it overnight? 5) Is it environmentally safe to produce and discard these 'nanosuits'?
    Reply
  • You can make carbon nanotubes pretty easily, but tailoring the length and whether you want single or multi wall in a controlled process can be frustrating. At least for now.
    Reply
  • Awesome I want a porous colossal carbon tube suit!!!!! YES YES YES!!!!!! drugs atomatic to me YEA!! ERROR ERROR OVERLOAD ON Drugsl....... shuting down
    Reply
  • Will this suit improve my chances with the ladies? *weirdo hand and eye movements*
    Reply
  • JonnyDough
    New life insurance policy questions:

    Do you sleep at night under a colossal carbon tube blanket?

    Do you wear a colossal carbon tube t-shirt to bed?
    Reply
  • igot1forya
    Curious to see how they are going to get around the whole Cancer causing problem... then again, soldiers only need to last longer than the battle right? Guess it doesn't matter if they die 4 years later as a civilian.

    http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/05/22/carbon-nanotubes-cause-cancer
    Reply