Skip to main content

Amazon Prime Reading is the Netflix of Books

Amazon Prime memberships offer tons of content, from unlimited streaming on Prime Video to all the album listens you could want on Prime Music. Today (Oct. 5), Amazon's returning to its literary roots by introducing Prime Reading, which opens up a trove of more than a thousand books, magazines, comics, Kindle Singles and other all-you-can read items.

Credit: Erlo Brown / Shutterstock.com

(Image credit: Erlo Brown / Shutterstock.com)

As is to be expected, Prime Reading isn't available on its own, but as a part of Amazon Prime, the company's $10.99 per month or $99 per year membership. You won't even need to use an Amazon device to access Prime Reading content, as it's also available on the free Kindle apps for Android and iOS.

MORE: Netflix vs. Hulu vs. Amazon Prime: Streaming Showdown

While Amazon didn't release a master list of the content available at the start of Prime Reading, titles will include books such as The Hobbit, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and The Man In the High Castle. Kindle Singles will also be a part of the package, including 'short-form' stories and essays from writers including Susan Orlean and Norman Mailer.

Comics such as The Complete Peanuts Vol. 1 and Transformers: Robots in Disguise Vol. 1 will also be included, as will current issues of the Sports Illustrated, Popular Mechanics and Runner's World magazines.

If this sounds familiar, Amazon also offers Kindle Unlimited, a $9.99 per month subscription that offers a library of more than 1 million books and thousands of audiobooks to choose from. Prime Reading is more for the casual reader, and not the obsessive.

The selection of titles available from Prime Reading will rotate, but Amazon hasn't explained how often new content will be added. We've reached out to the company for that information, and will update this story if we find out.

UPDATE, 8:28AM ET: Amazon responded to our query, stating, "There’s no hard rule. Titles will be updated regularly so customers will often find something new."